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Full text of "Vacation travel by Canadians in the United States / conducted by Traveldata International"

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A study of Canadian vacation patterns: 

Characteristics of travelers and trips to each 

of the nine regions of the U.S. 

as well as to the U.S. as a whole. 

Conducted by 
Traveldata International 

Sponsored by 
the United States Travel Service, 

the Canadian Government Office of Tourism, 

the Ministry of Transport (Canada) 

Saskatchewan Department of Tourism 

and 

the Montreal Star. Ltd. 



DECEMBER 1977 



Table of Contents 



Page 

SECTION I. HIGHLIGHTS OF CANADIAN VACATION TRAVEL IN 1976 1 

A. Introduction 1 

B. Methodology 1 

C. Highlights of the Findings 1 

SECTION II. CHARACTERISTICS OF CANADIAN VACATION TRIPS AND 

TRAVELERS TO THE SOUTH IN 1976 6 

A. Highlights 6 

B. Detailed Findings 10 

1. Trips/Receipts 10 

2. Traveler Characteristics 12 

a) Province of Residence 12 

b) Residence of Auto/Air Visitors 13 

c) Size of Community of Residence 15 

d) Language Spoken 16 

e) Type of Dwelling Occupied/Ownership 17 

f ) Sex 19 

g) Age 20 

h) Marital Status 21 

i) Education 22 

j ) Occupation of Head of Household 23 

k) Family Income 24 

1) Family Composition 25 

3. Trip Characteristics 26 

a) Purpose of Trip/Party Size 26 

b) Main Mode of Transport 28 

c) Use of Package Tours 29 

d) Seasonality 30 

e) Accommodation 32 

f) Length of Stay 33 

g) Use of a Travel Agent 34 

h) Decision Lead-Time 35 

i) Favorable Impressions of the U.S 36 

j) Unfavorable Impressions of the U.S 37 

LIST OF CHARTS 

Chart 1. — Canadian Vacation Trips and Expenditures in the U.S. in 1976 6 

Chart 2. — Characteristics of Canadian Vacation Trips to The South - 1976 

Expenditures in U.S. Only 11 

iii 



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LIST OF CHARTS— Continued 

Page 

3. — Canadian Vacation Travelers to The South in 1976 - By Residence 12 

4. — Canadian Vacation Travelers to The South in 1976 - By Residence of 

Auto Visitors 13 

5. — Canadian Vacation Travelers to The South in 1976 - By Residence of 

Air Visitors 14 

6. — Canadian Vacation Trips to The South in 1976 - By Size of City of 

Residence 15 

7. — Canadian Vacation Travelers to The South in 1976 - By Language 16 

8. — Canadian Vacation Travelers to The South in 1976 - By Type of 

Dwelling 17 

9. — Canadian Vacation Travelers to The South in 1976 - By Dwelling 

Ownership 18 

-Canadian Vacation Travelers to The South in 1976 - By Sex 19 

-Canadian Vacation Travelers to The South in 1976 - By Age 20 

-Canadian Vacation Travelers to The South in 1976 - By Marital Status 21 

-Canadian Vacation Travelers to The South in 1976 - By Education 22 

-Canadian Vacation Travelers to The South in 1976 - By Occupation 

of Head of Household 23 

-Canadian Vacation Travelers to The South in 1976 - By Family Income 24 

-Canadian Vacation Travelers to The South in 1976 - By Family 

Composition 25 

-Canadian Vacation Trips to The South in 1976 - By Purpose of Trip 27 

-Canadian Vacation Trips to The South in 1976 - By Main Mode of 

Transport 28 

-Canadian Vacation Trips to The South in 1976 - By Use of Packaged 

Tour Among Users of Public Transportation 29 

-Canadian Vacation Trips to The South in 1976 - By Seasonality 

(Quarterly) 30 

-Canadian Vacation Trips to The South in 1976 - By Seasonality 

(By Month) 31 

-Canadian Vacation Trips to The South in 1976 - By Type of 

Accommodation 32 

-Canadian Vacation Trips to The South in 1976 - By Length of Stay 33 

-Canadian Vacation Trips to The South in 1976 - By Use of Travel Agent 34 

-Canadian Vacation Trips to The South in 1976 - By Decision Lead-Time 35 

-Canadian Vacation Trips to The South in 1976 - By Favorable 

Impressions of U.S 36 

-Canadian Vacation Trips to The South in 1976 - By Unfavorable 

Impressions of U.S 37 

APPENDICES 

Appendix A. — Definition of United States and Canadian Regions 38 

Definition of Terms 39 

Appendix B. — Canadian Vacation Arrivals and Expenditures in the United States, 

by Characteristics of the Traveler, 1975/76 40 

Appendix C. — Canadian Vacation Travel to Multiple Regions in the U.S. in 1976 by Destination .... 49 

Appendix D. — Projected Expenditures 50 

Appendix E. — Canadian Vacation Party Expenditures 1974—1976 51 

Appendix F. — Questionnaire 52 



IV 



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27. 



SECTION I 



Highlights of Canadian Vacation Travel 

in 1976 



A. INTRODUCTION 

This report provides an analysis of a survey entitled 
"Vacation Travel By Canadians In 1976" con- 
ducted by TRAVELDATA INTERNATIONAL 
for both the U.S. and Canada. The sponsors of the 
survey were: (1) The United States Travel Service; 
(2) Canadian Government Office of Tourism; (3) 
Ministry of Transport (4) The Saskatchewan De- 
partment of Tourism and (5) The Montreal Star 
Ltd. 

The survey represents the eleventh in an annual 
series of studies describing Canadian travel patterns 
and vacationer characteristics. This report incorpo- 
rates series data, in some cases back to 1966, to 
facilitate trend analyses. 

The report contains 10 volumes. Volume 1 — Sum- 
mary Report — provides information on Canadian 
travel to the United States as a whole. The remain- 
ing nine volumes highlight Canadian travel to the 
nine U.S. tourist regions. 

Volume 1: SUMMARY REPORT— United States. 

Volume 2: NEW ENGL AND — Connecticut, 

Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, 
Rhode Island, Vermont. 

Volume 3: EASTERN GATEWAY— New Jersey, 
New York. 

Volume 4: GEORGE WASHINGTON COUN- 
TRY — Delaware, District of Columbia, 
Maryland, Pennsylvania, Virginia, West 
Virginia. 

Volume 5: THE SOUTH— Alabama, Arkansas, 
Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, 
Mississippi, North Carolina, South 
Carolina, Tennessee. 



Volume 6: GREAT LAKES COUNTRY— Illinois, 

Indiana, Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, 
Ohio, Wisconsin. 

Volume 7: MOUNTAIN WEST— Colorado, Mon- 
tana, Nebraska, North Dakota, South 
Dakota, Utah, Wyoming. 

Volume 8: FRONTIER WEST— Arizona, Kansas, 
Missouri, New Mexico, Oklahoma, 
Texas. 

Volume 9: FAR WEST— Alaska, California, 
Idaho, Nevada, Oregon, Washington. 

Volume 10: THE ISLANDS— American Samoa, 
Guam, Hawaii, Puerto Rico, Virgin 
Islands. 



B. METHODOLOGY 

This survey was based on a national probability sam- 
ple involving over 10,000 personal interviews with 
individuals 18 years old and over. The survey in- 
cludes data on travel to the U.S. Islands (American 
Samoa, Guam, Hawaii, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin 
Islands), as well as to the U.S. mainland, to illustrate 
total Canadian vacation travel to the U.S.A. 

Limitations: In some instances, the size of the sample 
used to determine the characteristics of Canadian 
travelers to various regions or states is small. Inter- 
pretation of data based on these small sample sizes 
should, therefore, be made with caution. 



C. HIGHLIGHTS OF THE FINDINGS 

1. Incidence of Canadian Vacation Travel 

• Fewer Canadians took vacation trips in 1976 than 
in the year before as the incidence of vacation 



travel dropped 3 percentage points from 59% in 
1975 to 56% in 1976. This represents an 8% 
drop in projected trips — from 8.3 million in 1975 
to 7.7 million in 1976. 

• This decline in vacation travel in 1976 was wide- 
spread as Canadians from most provinces (except 
Ontario and British Columbia) and all socio-eco- 
nomic groups and age categories traveled less than 
in 1975. 

• The decline in vacation travel occurred primarily 
among those who normally take only one vacation 
trip per year, as multiple trip takers continued to 
travel as often as before. The result was a very 
marginal increase in the average number of trips 
per year per traveler — from 1.50 in 1975 to 1.52 
in 1976. 



2. Destination of Canadian Vacation Trips 

• Continuing a trend, the U.S.'s share of the Cana- 
dian vacation travel market grew from its 21% 
share in 1974 and 23% in 1975 to a record high 
of 25% in 1976. 

• In contrast, travel by Canadians within Canada 
declined in share — from 66% of total trips in 
1975 to 62% in 1976. 

• Of the 2.1 million vacation trips to the U.S. in 
1976 (+2% over 1975), The South (25%) and 
The Far West (24%) were the most frequently 
visited regions. New England (17%), Eastern 
Gateway (15%) and Great Lakes Country (12%) 
were the next most popular regions among Cana- 
dian vacationers in the U.S. in 1976. 

• With respect to shifts in U.S. destination patterns 
by Canadians from 1975 to 1976, The Frontier 
West (+64%), George Washington Country 
( + 36%) and The U.S. Islands (+31%) re- 
corded the largest increases in Canadian vacation 
trips over 1975. 



• Canadian vacation expenditures in the U.S. were 
$996 million in 1976. This figure represents a 
31% share of the total 1976 Canadian vacation 
expenditures and a 28% increase over the esti- 
mated $777 million spent in the U.S. by Cana- 
dian vacationers just one year earlier. 

• Estimated expenditures for each region of the 
U.S. are dependent primarily upon the number of 
visitors, length of stay, accommodations used and 
purpose of trip. It follows, therefore, that The 
South (25%) and the Far West (18%) received 
the greatest shares of Canadian vacation spend- 
ing in the U.S. during 1976. The Frontier West 
(+177%) and George Washington Country 
(+88%) experienced the largest increases in vaca- 
tion receipts in 1976 over 1975. 

• The average trip expenditure (including transpor- 
tation) in the U.S. increased 19% from $687 in 
1975 to $815 in 1976, reflecting both a longer 
length of stay in the U.S. and the inflationary 
effects on the cost of travel. By way of compari- 
son, the average trip expenditure within Canada 
was estimated at $394 (+9% over 1975), while 
the comparable figure for overseas destinations 
was $1,603 (+2% over 1975). 

• Per day party expenditures for trips within Can- 
ada were estimated at $37 (+23% over 1975), 
$56 in the U.S. ( + 14% over 1975) and $71 
for overseas destinations ( + 1% over 1975). 

• With respect to travel to the U.S., the over 40 — 
married — upper income travelers tended to be the 
biggest spenders. In addition, those who traveled 
to the U.S. by air spent considerably more on the 
average than did those who traveled by car, while 
those on package tours and charter flights tended 
to spend more in the U.S. than did Canadians 
who traveled on scheduled flights or indepen- 
dently arranged vacations. 

• Finally, the winter market appeared to be more 
lucrative than the spring, fall or summer markets. 



3. Trip Expenditures 

• Although total vacation travel by Canadians in 
1976 declined 8% from 1975, a 10% increase 
in average party trip expenditures (from $554/ 
trip in 1975 to $607/trip in 1976) increased the 
total spending by Canadians on vacation trips in 
1976 to about $3.2 billion, or 9% more than the 
estimated $2.9 billion spent during 1975. 



4. Demographic Characteristics of the 1976 
Canadian Vacationer 

• The socio-economic profile of Canadian vacation- 
ers, differed with respect to certain characteristics 
depending on whether their trip was to the U.S., 
overseas or within Canada. 



Briefly, the Canadian domestic vacation traveler 
tended to be: married (62%); employed in a 
white collar position (33%), skilled laborer 
(31%), or retired (11%); about 40 years old 
(36% falling between 18-29 years of age and 
31% being 50 years of age or older); with a 
family income of at least $15,000 (52%); English 
speaking (67%); residing in an urban center 
(81%); and owning their own dwelling (64%). 

Comparatively speaking, the Canadian vacationer 
in the U.S. was: married (60%); tended to be 
employed more often in a white collar job (42%) 
and less often as a skilled laborer (29%) or re- 
tiree (10%); about 41 years of age (31% falling 
between 18 and 29 years of age and 33% being 
50 years of age or older); with a higher family 
income, as 58% earned $15,000 or more; Eng- 
lish speaking (66%); residing more often in an 
urban center (86%); and owned their own dwell- 
ing (65%). 



5. Trip Characteristics 



auto trios and 4% of the motor camper trips 
involved the services of a travel agent. As might 
be anticipated, the use of a travel agent was 
greater among air travelers; for trips which lasted 
longer than one week; for winter or non-summer 
trips; and trips to vacation spots. 

b) Mode of Transportation 

• Among all Canadian vacation trips, air travel 
accounted for 34%. one percentage point more 
than in 1975, but still well below the high level 
of 39% recorded during the energy crisis in 1974. 
Of all Canadian vacation trips to the U.S., 31% 
were bv air, representing a rebound from the 
relatively lower incidence (27%) of air usage 
in 1975 — and nearly equal to the 32% share of 
Canadian air travel to the U.S. recorded in 1974. 

• Auto travel to the U.S., on the other hand, has 
leveled off at about 58% in 1976, nearly equal 
to the 59% auto usage share reported in 1975. 
This share, however, is still well below the high 
rate of 65% auto share reported in 1973 which 
seems to suggest that the energy crisis of 1974 
has had some longer range effects on travel be- 
haviour. 



a) Trip Decision, Planning and Purchase Patterns c) Tours? charter and Independent Travel 



• The lead time in planning a U.S. vacation trip 
has not changed appreciably since 1975. Almost 
half (48%) made their decision to visit the U.S. 
within 4 weeks of their actual trip. 

• Automobile trips appear to be slightly more spon- 
taneous than air trips, as would be expected. 
Among auto travelers, 49% decided to visit the 
U.S. within four weeks of departure compared to 
slightly fewer, 44%, among air travelers. 

• The use of travel agents for planning a vacation 
trip continued to grow in 1976. One out of five 
(20%) contacted a travel agent in 1976, a sig- 
nificant increase over both the 16% usage rate 
in 1975 and the 7% usage rate recorded in 1970. 
In 1976, travel agents were most commonly used 
by air travelers (52%), when planning an over- 
seas trip (73%). when buying a package tour 
(83%) and when traveling on charter flights 
(88%). 

• In 1976, an estimated 2% of all Canadian vaca- 
tion trips to the U.S. involved the services of a 
travel agent. About 52% of the air trips to the 
U.S. and 17% of the bus and train trips involved 
a travel agent. On the other hand, only 4% of the 



• "Inclusive package tours" were defined for the 
respondent as being a trip where "transportation, 
accommodation and other ground arrangements 
were bought as part of a package price." The 
popularity of these types of inclusive package 
tours continued to grow among Canadian vaca- 
tioners. In 1976, 23% of all trips on common 
carriers involved a packaged tour. Th ; s is an in- 
crease over the 20% reported in 1975. 

• As expected, the purchase of inclusive package 
tours was more common among vacationers to 
the U.S. than for vacation travel within Canada. 
In 1976, 31% of all "non-auto" trips to the U.S. 
were inclusive package tours. 

• The Canadian's usage of charter flights for travel 
abroad did not appear to change between 1975 
and 1976. Of all trips by air, 20% were on 
charter services. Additionally, the usage of char- 
ters to both overseas areas (38%) and the 
U.S. has remained fairly level in 1975 and 1976 
(16% in 1975, 17% in 1976). 

• The most popular U.S. regional destinations 
among charter travelers were the U.S. Islands, 
Florida and California. 



By way of comparison, 7% of all air trips within 
Canada were on charter, 51% of the air trips to 
the Caribbean were by charter and 33% ( — 5% 
from 1975) to Europe were on charters. 



d) Seasonality 

• A slight shift in the seasonality of Canadian va- 
cation travel to the U.S. occurred between 1975 
and 1976. More Canadians visited the U.S. dur- 
ing the winter months of January to March (up 
to 28% in 1976 from 23% in 1975) while fewer 
(down to 35% in 1976 from 42% 1975) came 
through the traditionally well-traveled summer 
months of July thru September. The harsh 1976 
Canadian winter may have contributed to the 
smoothing of the seasonality factor. 

• On the other hand, the seasonality of Canadian 
domestic vacation travel has retained its previous 
seasonality patterns. However, trips to overseas 
destinations have shown a slight move towards 
more summer travel (+5% from 1975) and less 
winter travel ( — 4% from 1975). Possibly, the 
U.S. winter markets absorbed some of this shift. 

• While vacationing within Canada tended to be a 
summer activity, vacation travel to the U.S. con- 
tinued to be split more evenly between "summer" 
and "winter" seasons. Approximately 49% of the 
trips to the U.S. occurred between June and 
September and 29% between December and 
March. Overall, Canadian vacation arrivals in the 
U.S. on a quarterly basis were as follows: 1st 
Quarter (23%); 2nd Quarter (18%); 3rd Quar- 
ter (42%); and 4th Quarter (17%). 

e) Length of Trip 

• The average duration of trip among Canadians 
vacationing in the U.S. was 14.6 nights, only 
marginally longer than the 1975 trip duration 
of 14.3 nights. Of the total 14.6 nights, 12.6 
were in the U.S. while the remaining 2 nights 
were spent in Canada. It is interesting to note 
that of the 14.3 nights length of trip in 1975, 
12.3 nights were in the U.S. while, again, 2 
nights were spent in Canada. 

• With respect to Canadian vacation travel within 
Canada, a decrease in the length of stay was re- 
corded from 12.0 nights in 1975 to 10.8 nights in 
1976. This decline is primarily the result of 
shorter domestic vacation trips among residents 
of Quebec and Ontario. 



• The length of overseas trips averaged 22.5 nights 
in 1976, about the same as in 1975. 

f) Purpose of Trip 

• In 1976, the most frequently mentioned reason 
by Canadians for vacationing in the U.S. was "to 
spend some time at a vacation spot" (43%). The 
second most popular reason was "to visit friends 
and relatives" (41%), followed by "sightseeing 
and doing things in cities and towns" (26%). 
Participation in non-city activities was mentioned 
by 33% of the Canadians who vacationed in the 
U.S. with 17% mentioning sightseeing in rural 
areas and 16% mentioning camping, fishing, boat- 
ing and other outdoor activities. 

• Only 2% of the Canadians who vacationed in the 
U.S. during 1976 indicated that they were moti- 
vated primarily by Bicentennial events. It is pos- 
sible, however, that the Bicentennial may have 
had a less direct or secondary role in motivating 
Canadians to visit the U.S. 

• Skiing is unquestionably a popular sport among 
Canadians. According to the survey, at least one 
active skier lives in as many as 1 out of 4 house- 
holds (23%). However, most skiing was done 
within the province of residence. From only 2% 
of the households surveyed did someone take a 
ski trip to the U.S. in 1976. Less than half of one 
percent indicated having skied in other countries 
during the year. However, 5% of the households 
interviewed in British Columbia reported having 
skied in the U.S. during 1976. 

• "To visit friends and relatives" (48%) continued 
to be the most prevalent reason for taking a va- 
cation trip within Canada. Other frequently men- 
tioned reasons included "to spend time at a vaca- 
tion spot" (32%) and "sightseeing and doing 
things in cities and towns" (18%). 

• The average number of reasons offered by the 
traveler for "main purposes of trip" was 1.7. 
Overall, spending time at a vacation spot was more 
important in 1976 than in 1975 while camping 
and sightseeing were stressed less often. 



g) Composition of Traveling Party 

• Although the composition of the Canadian va- 
cation party traveling to the U.S. continued to be 
primarily "adults only" (58%), the average size 
party increased from 2.76 adults in 1975 to 3.20 
in 1976. 



In 1976, the most popular types of accommoda- 
tions used by Canadians vacationing in the U.S. 
were motels/hotels (65%), friends and relatives 
(32%) and campgrounds (19%). 

As one might expect, the type of accommodation 
used in the U.S. differed considerably depending 
on the nature of the destination. For example, 
camping was most popular in New England and 
the Mountain West Regions. Ethmc and social 
ties were strong motivations for Canadians who 
visited Massachusetts. California and the Great 
Lakes Region, as 49% on the average stayed 
with friends and relatives as compared to 32% 
for the U.S. as a whole. On the other hand, 
hotels/motels were utilized more often by "vaca- 
tion spot" visitors in The South and Far West 
Regions, 74% and 72% respectively. 



6. Impressions and Attitudes of Canadian 
Vacationers Toward the U.S. 

a) Prices in the U.S. vs. Canada 

• To some extent, the growth of travel to the U.S. 
and the recent increase in interest for shopping 
in the U.S. by Canadians may be an indicator of 
the belief that the U.S. is relatively less expensive 
for most goods and services than is Canada. Find- 
ings from the survey indicate that 41% of the 
respondents believe that Canada is more expen- 
sive than the U.S., compared to only 13% who 
felt that the U.S. was more expensive. The great- 
est perceived disparity in costs between the U.S. 
and Canada, where the U.S. was seen as being 
less expensive was with gasoline, followed closely 
by food, accommodations and souvenir/gift 
shopping. 



b) Favorable Impressions of the U.S. 

• Canadians who traveled to the U.S. on vacations 
during 1976 were asked what they perceived as 
their "most favorable impressions about vacation- 
ing in the U.S." 

• As in 1975, response was varied, again support- 
ing the theory that the U.S. provides a broad 
base of appeal to Canadians. The physical beauty 
and weather were most impressive to visitors — 
particularly the beaches and the water, as well as 
the scenery in general. PerhaDS as a result of the 
unusually cold and wet weather in many regions 
of Canada during 1976, more Canadians ap- 
peared to be attracted by the American climate — 
29% in 1976 as compared to 23% in 1975. 

• Another appeal of significance was "lower prices" 
— mentioned by 15%, up from 7% a year earlier 
and re-enforcing the "less expensive" image pre- 
viously discussed. 

• Further, only 16% did not provide a positive 
comment, suggesting a high degree of visitor sat- 
isfaction. 

c) Unfavorable Impressions of the U.S. 

• The U.S. appears to be increasing in favorability 
among Canadian vacationers as 65% of those 
who visited the U.S. in 1976 had no unfavorable 
comments — up from the 58% recorded a year 
earlier. 

• Among those who cited some negative aspects 
of travel in the U.S., the most frequent comments 
focused on "social conditions" such as "dirtiness 
and smog" (4%), "too crowded" (3%) and "vio- 
lence" (2%). Another 4% indicated that they did 
not like the food or beer. 



SECTION II 



Characteristics of Canadian Vacation Trips/Travelers 

To the South in 1976 



A. HIGHLIGHTS 

The number of Canadian vacation trips to The South 
during 1976 was estimated at 427,000, or 21% of 
the total 2 million vacation trips to the United States. 

The South's share of total vacation expenditures was 
somewhat higher than its share of vacation trips; 
25% (or $249 million) of the total $996 million 
spent by Canadians in the United States was spent in 
The South. Per capita expenditures on each trip 
averaged $375 as compared to the national figure of 
$283. This higher per capita trip expenditure in The 
South compared to the national average was related 
to the longer duration of the average trip to The 
South (17.3 nights vs. 12.6 nights for the U.S. as a 
whole); daily per capita expenditures were margin- 
ally lower than for the nation in general ($22 for 
The South vs. $23 nationally). 

427,000 Canadian Vacation Trips To The South 

(+4% from 1975) 

• 21% of all Canadian vacation trips to the 
U.S. 



• The most popular region in the U.S. for 
Canadian vacationers 

$249 Million Spent In The South By Canadian 
Vacationers In 1976 (+15% from 1975) 

• 25% of total Canadian vacation expendi- 
tures in U.S. 

• The largest recipient of Canadian vacation 
dollars in the U.S. 

• $375 spent per adult per trip (+20% from 
1975) 

• $22 per day per adult spent per trip (+10% 
from 1975) 

• The 15% increase in Canadian vacation 
spending in The South was related to in- 
creases in both increased numbers of visitors 
(+4%) and increased actual spending on a 
daily trip basis. 



Chart I 
CANADIAN VACATION TRIPS AND EXPENDITURES IN THE U.S., 1976 

Trips: 2,081,000 
100% 



Frontier 
West 



George Washington 
Country 




Receipts: $996,000,000 
100% 



loeorge Washington I ,-<y 

Country " l 



Mountain West 




1. Profile of Canadian Visitors To The South 
In 1976 



Canadians vacationing in The South in 1976 had 
the following characteristics: 87% were urban 
dwellers; 89% were from either Ontario or Quebec 
(59% and 30% respectively); 63% spoke English; 
74% owned their own homes; 53% were women; 
59% were married; 48% had either attended or 
completed high school while 38% had incomes of 
$20,000 or more; 44% were white-collar workers; 
55% had no children living at home. 



Their trips were characterized as follows: nearly 
half (49%) traveled to The South by car; 45% 
traveled during the first quarter (January to March); 
64% traveled to spend some time at a vacation 
spot while 34% engaged in sightseeing. Their aver- 
age length of stay was 17.3 nights. 



PROFILE OF 1976 CANADIAN VACATION TRAVELERS TO THE SOUTH 



Traveler Characteristics 
Residence: 



Dwelling Status: 

Sex: 

Age: 

Marital Status: 

Education: 

Occupation: 

Family Income: 

Family Composition: 
Trip Characteristics 
Purpose: 

Main Mode of Transport: 
Seasonality: 

Mean Length of Stay: 

Mean Size of Traveling Party: 

Use of a Travel Agent: 

Decision Lead Time: 

Favorable Impressions of 
of The South: 

Unfavorable Impressions 

of The South: 
Accommodation: 
Package Tours: 



Urban (87%) 

Ontario (59%) and Quebec (30%) 

English-speaking (63%) 

Population over 500,000 (45%) 

Ontario residence for auto visitors (67% ) 

Ontario residence for air visitors (46%) 

Live in single/semi-detached dwelling (71%) 
Own their own dwelling (74%) 

Female (53%) 

50 years and over (35%) and 18-29 years (27%) 
Married (59%) 

Attended or completed high school (48%) 
Professional /managerial/sales/white-collar (44%) and skilled 
workers (25%) 

$10,000 to $20,000 (41%) 
$20,000 and over (38%) 

Adults only (55%) 

To spend some time at a vatation spot (64%) and sightseeing (34%) 

Air (46%) and Auto (49%) 

1st quarter (45%) and 4th quarter (22%), March (20%), 

February (13%) 
17.3 nights 
3.30 persons 
38% used in planning 
Planned trip within 2 months of departure (54%) 

Weather (56%) 

None recalled (68%) 
Motel (49%), hotel (25%) 
On common carrier (35%) 



SIGNIFICANT CHANGES IN CANADIAN VACATION TRAVEL 
TO THE SOUTH FROM 1975 to 1976 



• Increases in: 



— detached or semi-detached home dwellers (65% to 71%) 

— homeowners (66% to 74%) 

—30 to 39 age group (13% to 20%) 

— vacationers with children (33% to 45%) 

— visitors in August (4% to 8%) 

— visitors staying 12 to 23 nights (42% to 50%) 

— visitors disliking nothing (61% to 68%) 



e Decrease in: 



■ — air visitors from Ontario (56% to 46%) 

— visitors from large urban centers of 500,000 or more (51% to 45%) 

— English-speaking visitors (73% to 63%) 

— apartment dwellers (21% to 16%) 

— tenants (34% to 26%) 

— the 50-plus age group (42% to 35%) 

— February visitors (18% to 12%) 

— hotel accommodation (31% to 25%) 

— visitors staying 24 nights or more (21% to 14%) 



SIGNIFICANT DIFFERENCES BETWEEN CANADIAN VACATION TRAVEL 
TO THE SOUTH AND TO THE U.S. AS A WHOLE 



The South compared to the U.S. as a whole had a much higher proportion of: 

— visitors from Quebec 

— visitors from Ontario 

— those living in detached or semi-detached homes 

— homeowners 

— visitors spending time at a vacation spot 

— auto travelers 

— first quarter visitors 

— March visitors 

— visitors staying in motels 

— visitors staying 12 nights or more 

— users of travel agents 



The South compared to the U.S. as a whole had a much lower proportion of: 

— visitors from British Columbia 

— visitors from the Prairies 

— tenants 

— those visiting friends or relatives 

— sightseers 

— air travelers 

— third quarter visitors 

— July and August visitors 

— visitors staying with relatives 

— visitors staying 5 nights or less 

— those having planned 4 weeks or less prior to their departure 



B. DETAILED FINDINGS 



The Canadian vacation market for The South dur- 
ing 1976 is described under the following three sec- 
tion headings: 1. Trips/Receipts; 2. Traveler Char- 
acteristics; and 3. Trip Characteristics. 

1. Trips/Receipts 

Again in 1976, The South ranked as the most popu- 
lar destination for Canadians vacations in the U.S., 
and again also ranked first in terms of receipts gen- 
erated by these visitors. An estimated 21% of 
Canadian vacation trips to the U.S. were to the 
region which also accounted for 25% of their ex- 
penditures, a slight decrease from the 28% share 
enjoyed in 1975. In absolute numbers, 427,000 
Canadians visited The South in 1976, 21% of the 
2,081,000 Canadian trips to the United States. (An 
additional 86,000 Canadian trips involved one or 
more nights in The South en route to other regions.) 
Of the nearly 1 billion dollars spent by Canadian 
vacationers in the U.S. ($996 million) in 1976, The 
South received an estimated $249 million. 



Trips to The South increased 4% from the 1975 
figure of 409,000, an increase greater than that ex- 
perienced by the U.S. as a whole. The per capita 
spending per trip increased slightly by one percent- 
age point— from 20% in 1975 to 21% in 1976. 

Canadian vacation expenditures in The South in- 
creased by 15% over 1975, less than the 28% 
growth registered by the U.S. as a whole. The per 
capita spending per trip increased by 20% over 
1975, from $313 to $375, a 2% increase over the 
1974 figure of $367. Daily per capita expenditures 
increased from $20 in 1975 to $22 in 1976. 

Florida remained the most popular destination with- 
in The South, with 84% of those vacationing in 
The South staying there one or more nights. Cana- 
dian vacationers to Florida spent an estimated $234 
million there, up 18% from last year's figure of 
$199 million, and representing 95% of all Cana- 
dian expenditures in The South. 



10 



Chart 2 
CHARACTERISTICS OF CANADIAN VACATION TRIPS TO 

THE SOUTH 
(1976 Expenditures in U.S. Only) 



Florida 
(372) 

Total South 
(443) 

Total U.S. 
(2,023) 



360,000(17%) 
427,000 (21%) 



2,081,000 
(100%) 



Vacation Trips 



$234 (23%) 
$249 (25%) 



$996 
(100%) 



Vacation 
Expenditures 
(millions of$) 



Florida 
(372) 

Total South 
(443) 

Total U.S. 
(2,023) 



$417 


$375 


$283 



Per Capita 
Expenditures 
on Each Trip 




Average No. of 
Nights Spent 



$24 


$22 


$23 



Daily Per Capita 
Expenditures 



U 



2. Traveler Characteristics 



This section presents a brief analysis of selected 
demographic characteristics of 1976 Canadian vaca- 
tion travelers to The South: province of residence; 
residence of auto/air vacationers; size of community 
of residence; language spoken; type of dwelling oc- 
cupied/owned; sex; age; marital status; occupation; 
family income; and family composition. 

a) Province of Residence 

Ontario remained the key market for Canadian va- 
cations to The South, accounting for 59% of all 
Canadians visiting there. Quebec was a distant sec- 
ond, the residence of 30% of Canadian vacationers 
to the region, while other provinces accounted for 
the small remainder: 11%. 



Some changes from the previous year were appar- 
ent: Ontario's share of Canadian vacationers to The 
South stood at 59% in 1976, a drop of 4 percent- 
age points from the 1975 figure of 63% (which it- 
self was a drop from the previous year's level of 
67%). Ontario's loss was taken up by British Co- 
lumbia whose share increased from less than 1% in 
1975 to 3% in 1976. 

Canadian visitors to Florida closely resembled visi- 
tors to the region as a whole. This could not be said 
of Canadians whose vacation destination were to 
other areas within the region: 71% originated from 
Ontario, while only 16% originated from Quebec. 



Chart 3 

CANADIAN VACATION TRAVELERS TO THE SOUTH 

IN 1976 BY RESIDENCE 



Residence 
Atlantic Provinces 



Quebec 



Ontario 



Prairies 



British Columbia 
AllOther 



Total Total Other 

U.S. South Florida South 



5% 



27% 



39% 



14% 



15% 



3% 



29% 



63% 



4% 



1% 



2% 



31% 



63% 



,3% 

i% 



18% 



70% 



!% 



3% 



1% 



All 
Total Total Other 

U.S. South Florida South 



4% 



26% 



39% 



15% 



16% 



3% 



30% 



59% 



5% 



-3% 



4% 



31% 



58% 



4% 



16% 



71% 



7% 



3% 



2% 
1% 



(Base) 



'Less than % of 1 % 



(2,071) (481) (392) (1 3£ 
1975 



(2,023) (443) (372) (119) 
1976 



12 



b) Residence of Auto/ Air Travelers 



Canadians traveling to The South by car or motor 
camper were more likely to be from Ontario than 
visitors to The South generally (67% for auto 
travelers vs. 59%) and less likely to come from 
Quebec (22% vs. 30%) a general conclusion 
similar to that drawn in 1975. By contrast, Quebec's 
share of the air travelers (40%) was greater than 



its overall share of travelers to The South (30%) 
while the reverse held true for Ontario (46% of 
air travelers and 59% of the travelers in general 
to The South). This was a change from 1975, when 
Ontario accounted for 56% of air travelers com- 
pared to Quebec's 35%. 



Chart 4 

CANADIAN VACATION TRAVELERS TO THE SOUTH 

IN 1976 BY RESIDENCE OF AUTO VISITORS 



Residence 
(Auto Visitors) 

Atlantic Provinces 



Total Total 

U.S. South Florida 



Total Total 

U.S. South Florida 



Quebec 



Ontario 



Prairies 



British Columbia 
AllOther 



6% 



30% 



37% 



15% 



12% 



24% 



69% 



3% 3% 



■*3% 

'1% 



23% 



70% 



3% 
1% 



4% 



26% 



39% 



15% 



16% 



22% 



67% 



5% 



5% 



1% 



21% 



71% 



7% 



1% 



(Base) 



* Less than Vi of 1 % 



(1,139) (228) (175) 
1975 



[1,172) (213) 
1976 



1160) 



13 



Chart 5 

CANADIAN VACATION TRAVELERS TO THE SOUTH 

IN 1976 BY RESIDENCE OF AIR VISITORS 



Residence of 
Air Visitors 

Atlantic Provinces 



Quebec 



Ontario 



Prairies 

British Columbia 
AllOther 



Total Total 

U.S. South Florida 



4% 3% 



22% 



43% 



14% 



16% 



l% 



35% 



56% 



5% 



1% 



2% 



38% 



57% 



2% 
'1% 



Total Total 

U.S. South Florida 



4% 



24% 



37% 



18% 



17% 



5% 



40% 



46% 



6% 



2% 



6% 



40% 



46% 



7% 



2% 



(Base) 



(679) (232) (209) 
1975 



(708) (204) (197) 
1976 



14 



c) Size of Community of Residence 

Canadian travelers to the South were very similar to 
Canadian travelers to the United States as a whole 
in terms of the size of their community of residence: 
45% came from large urban centers of $500,000 
or more population compared to 46% for Canadian 
visitors to the U.S. generally. An additional 27% 
came from intermediate-sized cities of 30,000 to 
500,000 population, the same percentage as for all 
Canadian visitors to the U.S. Other community sizes 
also reflected this similarity. 

The percentage of Canadian travelers to The South 
originating from the larger urban centers of 500,000 
or more dropped (to 45%) from the 51% registered 
in 1975. This was the only major change over time. 



Canadian visitors to areas of The South other than 
Florida were less likely to originate from the large 
urban centers than were visitors to the region as a 
whole. Only 35% of vacationers to destinations 
other than Florida originated from centers of more 
than 500,000 population compared to 45% for 
visitors to The South as a whole. Visitors from 
towns of under 1,000 of population accounted for 
11% of Canadian visitors to Florida, half the per- 
centage (22%) which other areas in the region drew 
from the same centers. 



Chart 6 

CANADIAN VACATION TRAVELERS TO THE SOUTH 

IN 1976 BY SIZE OF CITY OF RESIDENCE 



City Size 



Total 
U.S. 



Over 500,000 



100,000 to 500,000 

30,000 to 100,000 
10,000 to 30,000 
1.000 to 10,000 

Under 1,000 



47% 



16% 



10% 



5% 



)% 



14% 



Total 
South 



51% 



14% 



11% 



4% 



7% 



13% 



All 
Other 
Florida South 



52% 



13% 



1 1% 



3% 



7% 



14% 



44% 



14% 



10% 



7% 



9% 



16% 



Total 
U.S. 



46% 



16% 



9% 



6% 



9% 



14% 



Total 
South 



45% 



16% 



11% 



6% 



9% 



13% 



All 
Other 
Florida South 



45% 



18% 



10% 



7% 



9% 



1 1% 



35% 



18% 



14% 



5% 



6% 



22% 



(Base) 



(2,071) (481) (392) (139) 
1975 



(2,023) (443) (372) (119) 
1976 



15 



d) Language Spoken 

English-speaking Canadian visitors to The South 
were fewer, proportionately, in 1976 (when they 
accounted for 63% of all Canadian visitors to the 
region) than in 1975 when the figure stood at 73%. 

This decrease was made up by increased represen- 
tation from both the French-speaking visitors (up 



from 20% in 1975 to 26% in 1976) and from other 
language groups (up from 7% to 11%). 

These other language groups made up 18% of visi- 
tors to states other than Florida, almost double the 
1975 figure of 10%. 



Chart 7 

CANADIAN VACATION TRAVELERS TO THE SOUTH 

IN 1976 BY LANGUAGE 



Language 



English 



French (Quebec) 

French (Non-Quebec) 
Other 



Total 
U.S. 



67% 



19% 



12% 



Total 
South 



All 
Other 
Florida South 



2% 



73% 



18% 



7% 



2% 



73% 



19% 



7% 



1% 



78% 



10% 



10% 



2% 



Total 
U.S. 



66% 



17% 



4% 



13% 



Total 
South 



All 
Other 
Florida South 



63% 



21% 



5% 



1% 



64% 



22% 



5% 



9% 



66% 



10% 



6% 



18% 



(Base) 



(2,071) (481) (392) (139) 
1975 



(2,023) (443) (372) (119) 
1976 



16 



e) Type of Dwelling Occupied/ Ownership 

Canadians visiting The South were somewhat more 
likely to live in detached or semi-detached homes 
than were visitors to the U.S. as a whole. Of these, 
66% lived in this type of dwelling, while the pro- 
portion among visitors to The South was 71%, an 
increase over the 1975 figure of 65%. 

Canadian visitors to Florida were similar in this 
respect to visitors to The South as a whole, but visi- 



tors to other areas in the region were even more 
oriented toward this type of dwelling: 80% lived 
in a detached or semi-detached home. 

The trend toward home ownership among visitors to 
The South continued in 1975: only 26% were ten- 
ants, compared to 34% in 1975. This proportion 
held constant among all regions of The South. 



Chart 8 

CANADIAN VACATION TRAVELERS TO THE SOUTH 

IN 1976 BY TYPE OF DWELLING 



Type of Dwelling 



Total 
U.S. 



Single/Semi-Detached 



Row House 



Apartment 



Other 



67% 



12% 



19% 



Total 
South 



65% 



12% 



21% 



All 

Other 
Florida South 



2% 2% 2% 2% 



63% 



12% 



23% 



73% 



9% 



16% 



Total 
U.S. 



66% 



13% 



18% 



Total 
South 



All 
Other 
Florida South 



71% 



1 1% 



16% 



3% 2% 3% 



70% 



1 1% 



16% 



80% 



9% 



11% 



(Base) 

* Less than Vi of 1 % 



(2,071) (481) (392) (139) 
1975 



(2,023) (443) (372) 
1976 



1119) 



17 



Chart 9 

CANADIAN VACATION TRAVELERS TO THE SOUTH 

IN 1976 BY DWELLING OWNERSHIP 



Tenant vs. Owner 



Total 
U.S. 



Total 
South 



All 

Other 
Florida South 



Total 
U.S. 



Total 
South 



All 

Other 
Florida South 



Owner 



Tenant 



Not Stated 



64% 



36% 



66% 



34% 



66% 



34% 



70% 



30% 



65% 



35% 



74% 



26% 



74% 



26% 



74% 



26% 



(Base) 



(2,071) (481) (392) (139) 
1975 



(2,023) (443) (372) (119) 
1976 



Less than Vb of 1 %. 



f) Sex 

The male/female ratio among Canadian visitors to 
The South matched that for the U.S. as a whole, 
with women representing 53% of all visitors. This 
was a decrease from 1975 levels, when women rep- 
resented 56% of Canadian vacationers to The South 
and 54% of Canadian travelers to the U.S. as a 
whole. 



This decrease in travel by women was noticeable in 
Florida (from 58% in 1975 to 54% in 1976). Other 
destinations within the region stayed near their pre- 
vious level (46% in 1975, 47% in 1976), a level of 
female representation somewhat lower than the 
others. 



Chart 10 

CANADIAN VACATION TRAVELERS TO THE SOUTH 

IN 1976 BY SEX 



Sex 



Total 
U.S. 



Total 
South 



Florida 



All 
Other 
South 



Total 
U.S. 



Total 
South 



Florida 



All 
Other 
South 



Male 



Female 



46% 



54% 



44% 



56% 



42% 



58% 



54% 



46% 



47% 



53% 



47% 



53% 



46% 



54% 



53% 



47% 



(Base) 



(2,071! 



(481) (392) 
1975 



[139) 



(2,023) (443) (372) (119) 
1976 



19 



g) Age 



Though Canadians visiting The South continued to 
be somewhat older than those visiting the U.S. over- 
all, the difference was not as pronounced in 1976 
as in 1975. In 1976, 35% of Canadian vacationers 
to The South were aged 50 or over, compared to 
32% for all Canadian visitors to the U.S. In 1975, 
these figures were 42% and 33% respectively. 



The age distribution of Canadian visitors to Florida 
was virtually identical to that of all visitors from 
Canada to The South. Canadian visitors to other 
destinations in the region were more likely to belong 
to the 30 to 39 age group (29% vs. 20% for the 
region as a whole and less likely to belong to the 
younger age category (22% vs. 27% for The 
South). 



Chart 1 1 

CANADIAN VACATION TRAVELERS TO THE SOUTH 

IN 1976 BY AGE 



Age (Years) 



All 
Total Total Other 

U.S. South Florida South 



All 
Total Total Other 

US South Florida South 



18-29 



30-39 



40-49 



50 + 



33% 



19% 



15% 



33% 



29% 



13% 



16% 



42% 



29% 



12% 



15% 



44% 



24% 



16% 



15% 



45% 



31% 



20% 



17% 



32% 



27% 



20% 



18% 



35% 



29% 



18% 



18% 



35% 



22% 



29% 



16% 



33% 



(Base) 



(2,071) (481) (392) (139) 
1975 



(2,023) (443) (372) (119) 
1976 



20 



h) Marital Status 

From 1973 through 1976, the proportion of mar- 
ried Canadians visiting the U.S. remained virtually 
constant at approximately 60%. Married Canadians 
visiting The South, on the other hand, declined from 
their high of 67% in 1973 to their current level of 
59%, not significantly different from the national 
figure. 



As in 1975, there was no real difference in marital 
status between Canadians visiting Florida (60%) 
and those visiting other areas of The South (62%). 



Chart 1 2 

CANADIAN VACATION TRAVELERS TO THE SOUTH 

IN 1976 BY MARITAL STATUS 



Marital Status 



Total 
U.S. 



Total 
South 



Florida 



All 
Other 
South 



Total 
U.S. 



Total 
South 



All 
Other 
Florida South 



Married 



Unmarried 



60% 



40% 



62% 



38% 



64% 



36% 



64% 



36% 



60% 



40% 



59% 



41% 



60% 



40% 



62% 



38% 



(Base) 



(2,071) (481) (392) (139) 
1975 



(2,023) (443) (372) (119) 
1976 



i) Education 



The Canadian visitors to The South closely resem- 
bled Canadian visitors to the U.S. overall in terms 
of educational level; both distributions were virtu- 
ally unchanged from the 1975 profiles. 

Nearly half (48%) of The South's Canadian visitors 
had attended or completed high school (vs. 47% 
for the nation as a whole); 22% had university edu- 
cation or higher (vs. 24%); 18% had attended or 



graduated from technical school, identical to the 
U.S. as a whole. The remaining 12% (11% in the 
case of the Canadian vacationer to the United States 
overall) had attended or graduated from primary 
school. 

Educational differences between the Canadian visi- 
tor to Florida and those visiting other destinations 
in The South were negligible. 



Chart 13 

CANADIAN VACATION TRAVELERS TO THE SOUTH 

IN 1976 BY EDUCATION 



Education 
Primary School 



Total 
U.S. 



High School 



Technical/Preparatory 
School 



University or Higher 
Education 



11% 



48% 



17% 



24% 



All 
Total Other 

South Florida South 



13% 



49% 



17% 



21% 



14% 



51% 



15% 



20% 



13% 



44% 



18% 



2 5% 



All 
Total Total Other 

U.S. South Florida South 



11% 



47% 



18% 



24% 



12% 



48% 



18% 



22% 



12% 



48% 



18% 



22% 



8% 



54% 



14% 



24% 



(Base) 



(2,071) (481) (392) (139) 
1975 



(2,023) (43) (372) (119) 

1976 



22 



j) Occupation of Head of House 

The occupational profile of Canadian visitors to The 
South remained stable in 1976, with the single larg- 
est group of vacationers still represented by house- 
holds whose chief wage earner was employed in a 
white-collar occupation (professionals, managers, 
sales and clerical personnel). Visitors in this cate- 
gory accounted for 44% of Canadians vacationing 
in The South (compared to 42% for Canadian visi- 
tors to the U.S. overall). The other key occupational 
category was skilled workers, representing 25% of 
Canadian visitors to The South (29% nationally). 



Canadians visiting Florida were quite similar, on 
this dimension, to Canadians visiting The South 
overall. Some differences could be detected among 
Canadians visiting other areas in the region: white- 
collar workers were under-represented (35% vs. 
44% for The South as a whole), while skilled work- 
ers were somewhat more prevalent (30% vs. 25%). 
Retired persons only made up 8% of Canadian visi- 
tors compared to 13% for Canadians visiting Flor- 
ida. Finally, farmers and housewives (classified as 
"other" below) were less prevalent in Florida (10%) 
as they were in other areas of The South (16%). 



Chart 14 

CANADIAN VACATION TRAVELERS TO THE SOUTH 

IN 1976 BY OCCUPATION OF HEAD OF HOUSEHOLD 



Occupation of Head 
of Household 



Total 
U S. 



Total 
South 



Florida 



All 
Other 
South 



Prof ess lonal/Mgr. /Sales/ 
White Collar 






Skilled Workers 



Unskilled Workers 
Students 
Retired Persons 

Other'/Refused 



46% 



26% 



6% 



9% 



1 1% 



2% 



47% 



23% 



6% 



1 1% 



1 1% 



2% 



47% 



21% 



6% 



12% 



12% 



2% 



39% 



27% 



}% 



3% 



16% 



7% 



Total 
US 



Total 
South 



All 
Other 
Florida South 



42% 



29% 



5% 



10% 



12% 



2% 



44% 



2 5% 



6% 



3% 



11% 



1 1% 



45% 



24% 



6% 



13% 



10% 



2% 



35% 



30% 



7% 



8% 



16% 



(Base) (2,071) (481) (392) (139) 

1975 
'Primarily includes housewives and farmers 



(2.023) (443) (372) (119) 
1976 



23 



k) Family Income 



Nearly half of the Canadian visitors to The South 
(49%) had incomes in excess of $17,000 per year 
in 1976, a proportion unchanged from 1975 and 
one only slightly higher than for the U.S. as a whole 
(46% ). This figure, however, was an increase from 
the 1975 proportion of Canadian visitors to the 
United States overall (41%). In other words, the 



pace of income growth for all Canadians to the U.S. 
outstripped that of Canada's visitors to The South. 

The proportion of those earning $17,000 or more 
per year was slightly greater among Canadian vaca- 
tioners in Florida (52%) than it was for Canadians 
visiting the other areas of The South (46%). 



Chart 1 5 

CANADIAN VACATION TRAVELERS TO THE SOUTH 

IN 1976 BY FAMILY INCOME 



Family Income 
Under $5,000 
$5,000 to $7,499 

$7,500to $9,999 



$10,000 to $14,999 



$15, 000 to $16,999 



$17,000to $19,999 



$20,000 and Over 



Refused 



All 
Total Total Other 

U.S. South Florida South 



5% 



7% 



8% 



25% 



1 1% 



1 1% 



30% 



3% 



4% 



5% 



J% 



21% 



11% 



13% 



36% 



4% 



5% 



6% 



22% 



12% 



14% 



35% 



2% 2% 



5% 



5% 



10% 



13% 



11% 



15% 



39% 



2% 



All 
Total Total Other 

U.S. South Florida South 



6% 



5% 



7% 



21% 



12% 



12% 



35% 



2% 



6% 



6% 



17% 



12% 



12% 



37% 



2% 



3% 



7% 



9% 



16% 



12% 



14% 



38% 



12% 



9% 



18% 



10% 



7% 



39% 



1% 4% 



1% 



(Base) 



(2,071) (481) (392) (139) 
1975 



(2,023) (443) (372) 
1976 



(119) 



24 



1) Family Composition 

Adults with no children living at home made up the 
same proportion of Canadian visitors to the U.S. in 
1976 as in 1975 (58% ). This same category repre- 
sented 55% of Canadian visitors to The South, a 
significant decrease from the 1975 figure of 67%, 
and an apparent reversal of the "adults only" trend 
witnessed in The South since 1973. This decrease 
affected Florida's (where the proportion of house- 
holds with no children living at home dropped from 
69% in 1975 to 56% in 1976) and especially other 



destinations in The South where the proportion of 
Canadian adults-only households decreased from 
69% to 47% in 1976. 

Of households with children visiting The South, the 
majority (29% of visitors) were those with family 
members in the 5 to 14 years of age category, fol- 
lowed by those with children in the 15 to 17 age 
bracket (18%), and those with children under 5 
(12%). 



Chart 16 

CANADIAN VACATION TRAVELERS TO THE SOUTH IN 1976 

BY FAMILY COMPOSITION 



Family Composition 



Total 
U.S. 



Adults Only 



Adults with Children 

(W/Children 15-17) 
(W/Children 5-14) 
(W/Children under 5) 



58% 



42% 

17%) 
28% 
12% 



Total 
South 



67% 



33% 

14% 

23%) 

(8%) 



Florida 



69% 



31% 

13% 
22%) 

(8%) 



All 
Other 
South 



69% 



31% 

15% 

(24% 

7%) 



Total 
U.S. 



58% 



42% 

17% 
28% 
12%) 



Total 
South 



55% 



45% 

(18%! 
(29%. 
(12% 



Florida 



All 
Other 
South 



56% 



44% 

18%) 

27% 

11%) 



47% 



53% 

20% 

35% 
(18% 



(Base) 



(2,071) (481) (392) 
1975 



(139) 



(2,023) 



(443) (372) 
1976 



(1 19) 



25 



3. Trip Characteristics 



Presented in this section are analyses of the follow- 
ing characteristics of 1976 Canadian vacation trips 
to The South: purpose of trip/party s'ze; main mode 
of transport; use of package tours; seasonality; ac- 
commodation; length of stay; use of travel agent; 
decision lead-time; favorable impressions of the 
U.S.; and unfavorable impressions of the U.S. 

a) Purpose of Trip/Party Size 

Spending time at a vacation spot remained the dom- 
inant reason for travel to The South; 64% of Cana- 
dians vacationing there in 1976 ind'cated this as their 
main purpose, up from 61% in 1975. 

Not unexpactedly, spending time at a vacation spot 
was much more popular among The South's Cana- 
dian visitors (64%) and particularly Florida's (67%) 
than among Canadians visiting the U.S. overall 
(44%). 

Sightseeing was the second most important reason 
given by Canadians vacationing to The South: 34% 
mentioned this in 1976 as their main trip reason 
(down from the 1975 level of 42%). Sightseeing was 
relatively less important to Canadians visiting Flor- 
ida (30%) than it was to those visiting other areas 



of The South (47% 
1975). 



in 1976, down from 57% in 



Visiting friends or relatives was the key attraction for 
21% of Canadian visitors to The South, a decrease 
from the 25% who cited this reason in 1975, below 
the 35% of Canadians traveling to the United States 
overall. 

Seventeen percent (17%) of Canadians visiting The 
South engaged in outdoor activities, including camp- 
ing in 1975. This proportion was similar to Canadian 
visitors to the U.S. overall (16%) and to 1975 levels 
for The South (18%.) 

Shopping was a key attraction for 16% of Canadian 
visitors to The South, (an increase from the 13% of 
1975), especially among visitors to states other than 
Florida (19%), who were also more likely to have 
participated in outdoor activities, including camping 
(26% vs. 17% for The South as a whole). 

In 1976, the Canadian party vacationing in The 
South averaged 2.83 adults, an increase from 2.78 
in 1975, and slightly higher than the overall U.S. 
average of 2.72 (See appendix B-2). 



26 



Chart 17 

CANADIAN VACATION TRAVELERS TO THE SOUTH IN 1976 

BY PURPOSE OF TRIP 



Purpose of Trip 



To Spend Some Time at 
a Vacation Spot 



To Visit Friends or Relatives 
( — To Visit Friends) 
( — To Visit Relatives) 



Sightseeing and Doing 
Things in Cities and Towns 



Sightseeing and Doing 

Things Away from Cities 

and Towns 

Shopping 

Camping 

Fishing/Boating/or Other 

Outdoor Activities 

Combined Business 

and Pleasure 

To Attend Sports/Festivals/ 

or Other Special Events 

( — U.S. Bi-Centennial) 

( — Olympics) 

To Stay at a Summer , 

Place I Own ' 

Other 









All 


Total 


Total 




Other 


U S 


South 


Florida 


South 



42% 



33% 
(6%) 
23% 



28% 



18% 



14% 



10% 



1% 



6% 



9% 



6% 



61% 



25% 
13% 
16% 



25% 



17% 



13% 



7% 



1 1% 



5% 



'f- 70/ 

(-)£_! 

= .1 o/, 

fl/o 1% 



66% 



24% 
12% 
16%) 



23% 



14% 



12% 



5% 



1 1% 



~4 



7% 



% 
4% 
2% 



53% 



23% 
12%) 
15% 



32% 



25% 



17% 



13% 



14% 



i% 



15% 



7% 









All 


Total 


Total 




Other 


U.S. 


South 


Florida 


South 



<4%] 

d%: 



44% 



35% 
17% 
24% 



26% 



17% 



17% 



!% 



8% 



7% 



10% 



1 1% 



3 1% 



64% 



21% 
(9%) 
14% 



19% 



15% 



16% 



5% 



12% 



6% 



13% 
(5%) 
(1%) 



1 1% 



1% 



67% 



20% 
(9%) 
13% 



18% 



12% 



14% 



5% 



10% 



6% 



1 1 % 

(4%) 
(1%) 



12% 



31% 



56% 



20% 
(7%) 
16%H 



24% 



23% 



19% 



18% 



20% 
(4%) 



11% 



•2% 



(Base) 



(2,071 



(481) (392) 
1975 



(139) 



(2,023) (443) (372) 
1976 



(119) 



"Less than Vi of 1 % 

Note:Totals add to more than 100% due to multiple responses 



27 



b) Main Mode of Transport 

Nearly half (49%) of all Canadian vacation trips to 
The South in 1976 were taken by car, an increase 
over a 45% level in 1975. Though a slight increase 
occurred in car trips to Florida (from 42% to 43% 
in 1976), by far the largest difference was evident in 
trips to other areas of The South, were auto travel 
accounted for fully 85% of all Canadian trips, a sub- 
stantial increase from the 1975 figure of 66%. 



This sharp increase in auto travel to other destina- 
tions in The South was at the expense of air travel 
primarily, which declined from 22% in 1975 to only 
8% in 1976; travel by bus also dropped by half, 
from 10% to 5% in 1976. 



Chart 18 

CANADIAN VACATION TRAVELERS TO THE SOUTH IN 1976 

BY MAIN MODE OF TRANSPORT 



Main Mode of 
Transport 



Total 
U.S. 



Total 
South 



All 
Other 
Florida South 



Auto 




55% 



32% 



6% 



4% 



45% 



48% 



5% 



2'V 
1% 
1% 



42% 



53% 



3% 



66% 



22% 



10% 



3% 



1% 



All 
Total Total Other 

U.S. South Florida South 



54% 



35% 



6% 



3% 



49% 



46% 



4% 



1% 



43% 



53% 



3% 



1% 



86% 



7% 



5% 



2% 



(Base) 



(2,071) (481) (392) (139) 
1975 



(2,023) (443) (372) (119) 
1976 



Less than % of 1 % 



28 



c) Use of Package Tours 

Packaged tours (where "accommodation, transporta- 
tion fares and other arrangements are purchased for 
one package price") accounted for 35% of Cana- 
dians traveling by common carrier to The South 



(50%), an increase over the 1975 figure of 28%, 
and slightly higher than the proportion for Canadian 
travelers to the United States overall (32%). 



Chart 19 

CANADIAN VACATION TRIPS TO THE SOUTH IN 1976 

BY USE OF PACKAGED TOURS 



Total Total 

US South Florida 



Total Total 

US South Florida 



Independent Travel 



Packaged Tour 



Refused 



66% 



31% 



3% 



70% 



28% 



71% 



28% 



2% l |1% 



68% 



32% 



64% 



35% 



64% 



35% 



1% 1% 



(Base) 



(866) (260) (223) 
1975 



552) (223) (210) 
1976 



*Less than Vi of 1 % 



29 



d) Seasonality 



As indicated in the following two charts, The South 
remained a favored winter destination among Cana- 
dians: 45% traveled to the region during the first 
quarter, with 20% specifically choosing March. The 
first quarter figures for 1976 were slightly lower 
(at 45%) than the comparable period in 1975 
(48%), though both were substantially higher than 
the 23% registered for the U.S. overall in both 
years. 



The decline in first quarter travel experienced by 
The South was primarily due to a decline in first 
quarter travel to states other than Florida in the 
region. Only 25% of Canadian visits there were be- 
gun in the first quarter in 1976, compared to 36% 
in 1975. This decrease was offset by gains in the 
quarter (from 27% in 1975 to 36% in 1976), es- 
pecially in the month of August wh : ch saw its share 
more than double from the 1975 level of 6% to 
14% in 1976. 



Chart 20 

CANADIAN VACATION TRIPS TO THE SOUTH IN 1976 

BY SEASONALITY (QUARTERLY) 



Quarter Trip 
Started 



First Quarter 



All 
Total Total Other 

U.S. South Florida South 



Second Quarter 



Third Quarter 



Fourth Quarter 



23% 



17% 



42% 



18% 



48% 



15% 



14% 



23% 



54% 



12% 



9% 



25% 



36% 



18% 



27% 



19% 



All 
Total Total c ._ r ;da 0ther 
South f >u 



U.S. 



South 



23% 



18% 



41% 



18% 



45% 



14% 



19% 



22% 



51% 



1 1% 



15% 



23% 



25% 



18% 



36% 



21% 



(Base) 



(2,071) (481) (392) (139) 
1975 



(2,023) (443) (372) (119) 
1976 



30 



Chart 21 

CANADIAN VACATION TRIPS TO THE SOUTH IN 1976 

BY SEASONALITY (BY MONTH) 






Month Trip Started 


Total 
U.S. 




Total 
South 




-lorida 




All 
Other 
South 


January 


5% 




10% 


/% 


13% 


1% 

2% 
?% 


7% 




8% 


February 


13% 




18% 


March 


9% 


21% 


April 


6% 


16% 


May 


5% 


19% 




6% 


June 


20% 




1 1% 




20% 


July 


4% 


9% 




3% 




7% 


13% 




16% 


4% 




4% 


August 




7% 


4% 


6% 




4% 


3% 




7% 


7% 






September 


3% 






7% 


4% 


7% 


7% 


October 


6% 




16% 


6% 




5% 


November 


14% 




7% 


December 


6% 


(Base) ( 


2,071 




481) 
1 


97 


(392) 
5 




(139) 



Total 
U.S. 



7% 



7% 



9% 



6% 



4% 



7% 



19% 



1 5% 



1% 



4% 



6% 



All 
Total Other 

South Florida South 



12% 



13% 



20% 



7% 



3% 



4% 



7% 



7% 



5% 



7% 



5% 



10% 



14% 



1 5% 



22% 



6% 



6% 



5% 



4% 



6% 



6% 



1 1% 



2% 
3% 



4% 



13% 



7% 



6% 



5% 



16% 



14% 



6% 



7% 



1 1% 



3% 



(2,023) (443) (372) (119) 
1976 



31 



e) Accommodation 



Motels were the most popular form of accomma- 
dation, used by 49% of Canadians visiting The 
South, an increase over the 1975 rate of 45%. Both 
years were substantially higher than the comparable 
figures for the United States as a whole (37% in 
1975 and 38% in 1976). 

Hotels were the second-most popular form of ac- 
commodation, used by 1 in 4 (25%) of Canadian 
vacationers to The South, followed by 19% who 
stayed with friends or relatives, and 14% who 
camped on private or government campgrounds. In 
view of the relative popularity of motels, it was not 
surprising to note that all these forms of accommo- 



dation were less popular than in the United States 
as a whole. This was particularly true in the case of 
staying with friends or relatives, which accounted 
for 20% of Canadians visiting the U.S. overall, but 
only 9% of visitors from Canada to The South. 

Canadians visiting Florida were similar to all 
Canadians visiting The South in terms of the type 
of accommodation they preferred. Canadians visit- 
ing the other states of the region, however, were 
more likely to stay in motels (63% vs. 49% for 
The South as a whole), and more likely to camp 
(30% vs. 14%); conversely, they were less likely 
to stay in hotels (13% to 25 % ) . 



Chart 22 

CANADIAN VACATION TRIPS TO THE SOUTH IN 1976 

BY TYPE OF ACCOMMODATION 



Type of Accommodation 



Total 
U.S. 



Total 
South 



All 
Other 
Florida South 



(Base) 



(2,071) (481) (392) (139) 
1975 



Total 
U.S. 



Total 
South 



All 
Other 
Florida South 



Motel 


37% 




45% 




44% 




61% 




38% 




49% 




48% 




63% 




27% 




25% 


Hotel 


31% 


31% 




25% 


27% 




26% 




13% 




20% 




18% 


With Relatives 


10% 




10% 


10% 


14% 


9% 


8% 


9% 




1 1% 


12% 


With Friends 


10% 


10% 


9% 


20% 


10% 




9% 




10% 


10% 


Private Campgrounds 


8% 


8% 


11% 


8% 


7% 


Government Campgrounds 


8% 


4% 


5% 


9% 


6% 


6% 


10% 


5% 


14% 




13% 


14% 


14% 


13% 


13% 


Other 


12% 


10% 



(2,023) (443) (372) 
1976 



(1 19) 



Note: Totals may not add to 1 00% due to multiple responses 



32 



f) Length of Stay 

Canadian visitors to The South in 1976 stayed an 
average of 17.3 nights in the U.S., substantially 
higher than the national average of 12.6 nights. 

Nevertheless, the 1976 average for The South was a 
decline from the 19.7 nights averaged in 1975, a 
decline felt in all regions (Florida decreasing to 18.3 



nights from 21.1 in 1975, and other areas decreas- 
ing to 15.8 from 17.5). 

50% of Canadian visitors to The South stayed be- 
tween 12 and 23 nights in the U.S., compared to 
only 32% for the nation as a whole. Another 28% 
stayed 6 to 11 nights, while 14% (a decrease from 
21% in 1975) stayed 24 nights or more. 



Chart 23 

CANADIAN VACATION TRIPS TO THE SOUTH IN 1976 

BY LENGTH OF STAY 



Number of Nights 
in U.S. 



1 -3 Nights 



4-5 Nights 



6-1 1 Nights 



12-23 Nights 



24 Nights and Over 

Don't Know/ 

Can't Remember — 



All 
Total Total Other 

U.S. South Florida South 

2% 



17% 



13% 



30% 



29% 



9% 



2% 



4% 



4% 



27% 



42% 



21% 



2% 



26% 



45% 



23% 



2°o 



2% 



11% 



1% 



21% 



39% 



20% 



2% 



Total 
U.S. 



12% 



12% 



31% 



32% 



9% 



4% 



All 
Total Other 

South Florida South 

1% 



3% 



28% 



50% 



14% 



2% 



3% 



3% 



25% 



53% 



16% 



2', 



6% 



4% 



29% 



44% 



15% 



3% 



(Base) 



(2,071) (481) (392) (139) 



(2,023) (443) (372) (119) 



Mean Nights 



12.2 19.7 21.1 17.5 



12.6 17.3 18.3 15. I 



1975 



1976 



33 



g) Use of a Travel Agent 



In 1976, 38% of vacation trips to The South in- 
volved the use of travel agents, an increase over the 
1975 figure of 34%. In both years, usage was no- 
tably higher than for the U.S. as a whole (which was 
23% in 1975, 27% in 1976), a possible reflection 
of the high incidence of air travel among Canadian 
vacationers to The South. 



The variations in air travel between Florida (53%) 
and other destinations in The South (8%) would 
also explain why only 19% of vacationers to the 
latter areas used a travel agent (vs. 40% for Flor- 
ida-bound Canadian travelers). 



Chart 24 

CANADIAN VACATION TRIPS TO THE SOUTH IN 1976 

BY USE OF A TRAVEL AGENT 



Use of Agent in 
Planning Trip 



Total 
U.S. 



Total 
South 



All 
Other 
Florida South 



Total 
U.S.. 



Total 
South 



All 

Other 
Florida South 



Do Not Use 



Use 



77% 



23% 



66% 



34% 



64% 



36% 



76% 



24% 



73% 



27% 



62% 



38% 



60% 



40% 



81% 



19% 



(Base) 



(2,071) (481) (392) (139) 
1975 



(2,023) (443) (372) (119) 
1976 



34 



b) Decision Lead Time 

A strong majority (65%) of Canadians visiting The 
South in 1976 had made their travel plans more 
than one month ahead of time, compared to 53% 
for Canadians traveling to the U.S. as a whole. 
These proportions were virtually unchanged from the 
1975 results (53% for the nation as a whole, and 
66% for Canadian travelers to The South). 

However, the largest single group of Canadians vis- 
iting The South (33%) had made their decision 



within one month of traveling, compared to 43% 
for Canadians visiting the United States overall. 

Interestingly, a trip to Florida in comparison with 
other areas in The South did not involve a longer 
decision lead-time, and if anything, the reverse held 
true. While 61% of all Canadians vacationing in the 
state of Florida decided to visit the U.S. more than 
one month prior to departure, 77% of visitors to 
other areas in The South made their decision within 
this period. 



Chart 25 

CANADIAN VACATION TRAVELERS TO THE SOUTH IN 1976 

BY DECISION LEAD-TIME 



Decision to Visit 
U.S. Lead-Time 



6 Months or Over 



4 Months up to 6 Months 



2 Months up to 4 Months 



1 Month up to 2 Months 



Up to 4 Weeks Before 



During Trip 



All 
Total Total Other 

U S South Florida South 



13% 



6% 



15% 



19% 



44% 



3% 



15% 



9% 



20% 



22% 



33% 



1% 



17% 



9% 



19% 



23% 



32% 



18% 



!% 



22% 



18% 



32% 



2% 



All 
Total Total Other 

U.S. South Florida South 



14% 



7% 



14% 



18% 



43% 



4% 



19% 



7% 



18% 



21% 



33% 



19% 



5% 



18% 



20% 



36% 



2% 2% 1 



27% 



14% 



16% 



20% 



22% 



(Base) 



(2,071) (481) (392) (139) 
1975 



(2,023) (443) (372) (119) 
1 976 



•Less than x h of 1% 



35 



i) Favorable Impressions of The U.S. 

The South's status as a winter destination was re- 
flected in the favorable impressions of the United 
States mentioned by Canadian visitors to the region: 
56% commented favorably on the weather, com- 
pared to only 31% for the nation as a whole. 

Other favored comments included, the facilities 
(26%), the physical beauty (23%) — including the 



beaches, the ocean, and the scenery in general — 
and a variety of specific attractions (19%). 

While the climate and warm, sunny weather were 
most important to visitors to Florida (61%), visitors 
to other areas of the region were more likely to 
mention facilities and the physical beauty (38% and 
33%) than were visitors to Florida (24% and 22% 
respectively). 



Chart 26 

CANADIAN VACATION TRIPS TO THE SOUTH IN 1976 

BY FAVORABLE IMPRESSIONS OF THE U.S. 



Favorable Impressions 



Facilities 



Physical Beauty 



Weather 



People/Way of Life 



Attractions 



Miscellaneous 



None Mentioned 



All 
Total Total Other 

US South Florida South 



30% 



29% 



23% 



19% 



17% 



19% 



17% 



22% 



27% 



52% 



17% 



19% 



16% 



6% 



23% 



23% 



60% 



18% 



18% 



15% 



6% 



29% 



40% 



32% 



20% 



19% 



17% 



5% 



All 

Total Total Other 

U.S. South Florida South 



33% 



31% 



31% 



18% 



18% 



17% 



15% 



26% 



23% 



56% 



19% 



19% 



18% 



8% 



24% 



22% 



61% 



20% 



18% 



17% 



5% 



38% 



33% 



38% 



16% 



25% 



18% 



6% 



(Base) 



(2,071) (481) (392) (139) 
1975 



(2,023) (443) (372) (119) 
1976 



Note: Totals may add to more than 1 00% due to multiple responses 



36 



j) Unfavorable Impressions of the U.S. 

A majority (65% ) of Canadians visiting the United 
States indicated they had no unfavorable impres- 
sions, an increase from the 1975 figure of 58%. 



Chart 27 

CANADIAN VACATION TRIPS TO THE SOUTH IN 1976 

BY UNFAVORABLE IMPRESSIONS OF U.S. 



Unfavorable Impressions 



Nothing Disliked 



Social Conditions 

Facilities 

Weather 

Attitudes 
Prices 

Miscellaneous 



All 
Total Total Other 

U.S. South Florida South 



58% 



15% 



5% 



6% 



3% 



14% 



61% 



1 1% 



5% 



6% 



4% 



12% 



64% 



10% 



3% 



6% 



[% 



1 1% 



46% 



15% 



S% 



!% 



7% 



4% 



20% 



All 
Total Total Other 

U.S. South Florida South 



65% 



14% 



6% 



4% 



5% 



12% 



2% 



68% 



1 1 % 



7% 



4% 



4% 



10% 



2% 



68% 



10% 



7% 



4% 



5% 



10% 



2". 



62% 



20% 



5% 



3% 



6% 



4% 



8% 



(Base) 



(2,071) (481) (392) (139) 
1975 



(2,023) (443) (372) 
1976 



(1 19) 



Note: Totals add to more than 1 00% due to multiple responses 



37 



APPENDICES 



Appendix A 



I. DEFINITION OF UNITED STATES AND CANADIAN REGIONS 



U.S. REGIONS 

1. NEW ENGLAND 

Connecticut 
Maine 

Massachusetts 
New Hampshire 
Rhode Island 
Vermont 

2. EASTERN GATEWAY 

New Jersey 
New York 

3. GEORGE WASHINGTON 
COUNTRY 

Delaware 

District of Columbia 

Maryland 

Pennsylvania 

Virginia 

West Virginia 

4. THE SOUTH 

Alabama 

Arkansas 

Florida 

Georgia 

Kentucky 

Louisiana 

Mississippi 

North Carolina 

South Carolina 

Tennessee 



5. 



7. 



GREAT LAKES 


9. ISLANDS 


COUNTRY 






American Samoa 


Illinois 


Guam 


Indiana 


Hawaii 


Iowa 


Puerto Rico 


Michigan 


Virgin Islands 


Minnesota 




Ohio 




Wisconsin 




MOUNTAIN WEST 




Colorado 


CANADIAN REGIONS 


Montana 




Nebraska 


ATLANTIC PROVINCES 


North Dakota 




South Dakota 


Newfoundland 


Utah 


Prince Edward Island 


Wyoming 


Nova Scotia 




New Brunswick 


FRONTIER WEST 






QUEBEC 


Arizona 




Kansas 


ONTARIO 


Missouri 




New Mexico 


PRAIRIE PROVINCES 


Oklahoma 




Texas 


Manitoba 




Saskatchewan 


FAR WEST 


Alberta 


Alaska 


BRITISH COLUMBIA 


California 




Idaho 


Other 


Nevada 




Oregon 


Yukon/N.W.T. 


Washington 





38 



II. DEFINITION OF TERMS 



The definitions used in the study were as follows: 

"Vacation" defined for the respondent as not in- 
cluding weekends or long weekends or statutory 
holidays; or "working holidays." Beyond this, the 
definition was intentionally left up to the respondent. 
This procedure was carefully established to avoid 
a long series of arbitrary decisions as to what was 
and what was not a vacation. For example, house- 
wives, professional men, retired people and students 
would each have acquired explicit, arbitrary, and 
perhaps even inconsistent criteria laid down as to 
what constituted a vacation. Consequently, the de- 
finition of a vacation was completely subjective 
(aside from the above list of what it was not): 
if the respondent thought he had a vacation, it was 
considered that he did. 

"Vacation trip" essentially is absence from home. 
Once again, the precise definition was the respond- 
ent's. In practice, virtually all trips reported were 
of at least one night's duration, and this can be 
taken as the working criterion. 

For analytical purposes a further definitional re- 
quirement of a "trip" was made, such that it was 
"a person or group of people from the same house- 
hold traveling together." If husband and wife trav- 
eled together, it was deemed reasonable that this 
should be regarded as one trip, not two. For ex- 
ample, they would probably have made a single joint 
decision to go on the trip. If they went with a couple 



from another household, this second pair probably 
would have made a separate decision, so this four- 
some could be regarded as two trips. 

Since individuals (18 or over) were interviewed for 
these studies, the problem could arise of double 
counting (or multiple counting) of trips — for ex- 
ample, interviewing husband and wife who had been 
on a trip together would show two trips, not one. 
Weighting was used to compensate for this possi- 
bility. For each trip it was ascertained how many 
people (18 and over from the same household) had 
been on the trip. The reciprocal of this number 
served as the basis for this corrective weighting. 



III. METHODOLOGY 

This survey was conducted by Traveldata Interna- 
tional using a national probability sample including 
all but 7% of the entire Canadian population (i.e. 
persons mainly in institutions or in northern regions 
of the country). The data are based on approxi- 
mately 10,000 personal interviews with individuals 
18 years and over. Checkbacks were made with 
approximately 20% of the interviews completed by 
each interviewer as a quality control measure. De- 
tails were recorded for up to three vacation trips 
per respondent to minimize seasonal bias. No more 
than two percent of the respondents took more than 
three such trips, so this survey represents virtually a 
complete sample of all vacation trips. 



39 



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47 



APPENDIX C 



Appendix C-l 
CANADIAN VACATION TRAVEL TO MULTIPLE REGIONS IN THE U.S. IN 1976 BY DESTINATION 



Destination: 







New England 




Eastern Gateway 


George 
Wash- 
ington 


Total 




Massa- 


All 


New New 


U.S. 


Total 


Maine chusetts 


Other 


Total York Jersey 


Country 



% % % % % % % % % 



New England 17 

(Maine) 8 

(Massachusetts) 5 

(All other) 7 

Eastern Gateway 15 

(New York) 12 

(New Jersey) 3 

George Washington Country 6 

The South 25 

(Florida) 21 

(All other) 7 

Great Lakes Country 12 

Mountain West 9 

Frontier West 5 

Far West 24 

(California) 12 

(Washington) 9 

(All other) 10 

Islands Region 8 

U.S. Unspecified 121 

Total U.S. 2023 

(Base) * 



100 


100 


100 


100 


14 


15 


11 


10 


46 


100 


10 


22 


7 


7 


7 


3 


28 


6 


100 


13 


7 


8 


5 


3 


42 


20 


20 


100 


9 


10 


8 


9 


12 


12 


21 


19 


100 


100 


100 


22 


11 


12 


21 


18 


84 


100 


22 


21 


2 


3 


3 


3 


20 


5 


100 


6 


4 


2 


4 


7 


9 


10 


11 


100 


4 


3 


3 


5 


6 


7 


3 


22 


4 


3 


2 


5 


3 


4 


1 


12 


3 


3 


3 


3 


5 


5 


3 


20 


3 


2 


5 


5 


8 


9 


3 


11 


3 


2 


4 


4 


3 


3 


1 


5 


1 


2 


1 


1 


2 


3 


— 


3 


2 


1 


1 


3 


2 


2 


2 


5 


1 


— 


1 


2 


1 


1 


— 


2 






— 


1 


1 


1 


— 


2 


1 


1 


1 
131 


2 


1 


1 


2 


3 

1 

179 


129 


124 


146 


144 


149 


131 


390 


184 


109 


162 


274 


224 


64 


118 



48 



Appendix C-2 
CANADIAN VACATION TRAVEL TO MULTIPLE REGIONS IN THE U.S. IN 1976 BY DESTINATION 



Destination: 



The South 



All 



Great 
Lakes 



Moun- 
tain 



Fron- 
tier 



Total Florida Other Country West West Total 



Far West 

— — U.S. 

Cali- Wash- All Islands 
fornia ington Other Region 



0/ 

/o 

New England 3 

(Maine) 1 

(Massachusetts) 1 

(All other) 2 

Eastern Gateway 3 

(New York) 3 

(New Jersey) * 

George Washington Country _ 5 

The South 100 

(Florida) 84 

(All other) 27 

Great Lakes Country 10 

Mountain West 1 

Frontier West 3 

Far West 3 

(California) 1 

(Washington) 1 

(All other) * 

Islands Region * 

U.S. Unspecified * 

Total U.S. 128 

(Base) 443 



0/ 

/o 



0/ 

/o 



°/ 
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/o 



°/ 
/o 



% 



0/ 

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% 



% 



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3 


8 


5 


5 


5 


1 


1 


1 


2 




1 


4 


1 


2 


4 




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1 


— 


1 


2 


2 


2 


1 






— 






2 


4 


3 


3 


1 


1 


1 


1 


2 


— 


2 


10 


9 


2 


8 


2 


1 


1 


2 


— 


2 


10 

1 


9 

1 


2 
1 


8 


1 


1 


1 


1 
1 


— 


4 


19 


6 


3 


3 


2 


1 


2 


2 


1 


100 


100 


20 


3 


14 


3 


2 


3 


1 


1 


100 


40 


10 


1 


7 


2 


2 


3 


1 


1 


13 


100 


18 


3 


14 


1 


1 


2 


1 


— 


6 


34 


100 


28 


22 


5 


4 


7 


5 


1 


1 


5 


20 


100 


26 


13 


13 


16 


22 




2 


10 


8 


14 


100 


7 


10 


3 


12 


— 


2 


4 


10 


34 


35 


100 


100 


100 


100 


7 


1 


1 


4 


18 


25 


52 


100 


23 


36 


5 


1 


2 


5 


16 


5 


38 


17 


100 


37 


2 




1 


4 


25 


24 


42 


29 


41 


100 


1 




— 


1 




— 


3 


3 


2 


1 


100 


120 


190 


179 


189 


213 


136 


135 


135 


147 


110 


372 


119 


197 


181 


89 


542 


249 


228 


237 


189 



49 



APPENDIX D 



PROJECTED EXPENDITURES 

1975 
$ 



Vacation Expenditures by Canadians 

Total 

Total Vacation Expenditures by Canadians 
Spending One or More Nights In: 

Canada 

Atlantic Provinces 

Quebec 

Ontario 

Prairie Provinces 

British Columbia 

Offshore Countries 

Total U.S. Expenditures by Canadians 
Spending One or More Nights In: 

U.S.A. 

U.S. (Mainland Only) 

New England 

Eastern Gateway 

George Washington Country 

The South 

Great Lakes Country 

Mountain West 

Frontier West 

Far West 

U.S. Islands 



2,923,000,000 



1976 
$ 



3,185,000,000 



Percentage 
Increase 

~% 



+ 9 



1,389,000,000 


1,380,000,000 


- 


1 


234,000,000 


201,000,000 


- 


14 


304,000,000 


280,000,000 


- 


8 


460,000,000 


468,000,000 


+ 


2 


405,000,000 


490,000,000 


+ 


21 


408,000,000 


425,000,000 


+ 


4 


919,000,000 


987,000,000 


+ 


7 



777,000,000 


996,000,000 


+ 28 


672,000,000 


911,000,000 


+ 36 


72,000,000 


101,000,000 


+ 40 


99,000,000 


100,000,000 


+ 1 


34,000,000 


64,000,000 


+ 88 


272,000,000 


323,000,000 


+ 19 


64,000,000 


110,000,000 


+ 72 


60,000,000 


93,000,000 


+ 55 


35,000,000 


97,000,000 


+ 177 


191,000,000 


238,000,000 


+ 25 


101,000,000 


165,000,000 


+ 63 



50 



APPENDIX E 



CANADIAN VACATION PARTY EXPENDITURES, 1974-1976 

Average Expenditures Per Vacation Party 

Per Trip Per Day 



Base 
Areas Visited Overnight or Longer 

Total 

Total Canada 

Atlantic Provinces 

Quebec 

Ontario 

Manitoba 

Saskatchewan 

Alberta 

British Columbia 

U.S.A. (Mainland)* 

All Other Countries 



■Includes expenditures made while traveling to and from the US. 
The amount actually spent in the U.S. per party was $770 in 1976 



1974 


1975 


1976 


1974 


1975 


1976 


(4,766) 


(5,367) 


(4,907) 


(4,766) 


(5,367) 


(4,907) 


$ 


$ 


$ 




$ 




479 


554 


607 


36 


42 


48 


312 


363 


394 


27 


30 


37 


403 


459 


505 


32 


33 


38 


307 


383 


352 


27 


31 


34 


291 


384 


383 


25 


31 


34 


481 


552 


677 


23 


31 


35 


421 


597 


617 


25 


35 


37 


445 


471 


663 


31 


31 


42 


401 


427 


551 


28 


30 


37 


616 


687 


815 


44 


49 


56 


1,373 


1,575 


1,603 


59 


70 


71 



51 



APPENDIX F 

QUESTIONNAIRE 



ABOUT TRAVEL— ASK EVERYONE 18 YEARS OF AGE AND OVER 



1-a) Did you or any members of your household snow ski during the past 12 months? 

YES 10-1 NO 2 GO TO Q. 2-a) 

•b) In which provinces, states, and countries did any of them ski during the past 12 months? 

CANADA: 

B.C. 11-1 

ALBERTA 2 

SASKATCHEWAN 3 

MANITOBA 4 

ONTARIO 5 

QUEBEC 6 

NEW BRUNSWICK 7 

NOVA SCOTIA 8 

P.E.I. 9 

NEWFOUNDLAND 

TERRITORIES X 

U.S.A.: 

WASHINGTON Y 

IDAHO 12-1 

UTAH 2 

COLORADO 3 

NEVADA 4 

NEW YORK 5 

VERMONT 6 

OTHER STATES (SPECIFY) 

OTHER COUNTRIES 8 

13- 

2-a) Now for some questions on travel. Have you ever flown on a commercial airline? 

Yes 14-1 NO 2 GO TO Q. 3-a) 

-b) Of all the trips you took by air during the past 12 months, if any, how many were primarily for business 
reasons, and how many were primarily for non-business reasons? 

NONE __ 00 

NO. OF BUSINESS TRIPS 
(15/16) 

NONE __ 00 

NO. OF NON-BUSINESS TRIPS 
(17/18) 



52 



3-a) Now, some questions on holidays, during which you might have travelled or stayed at home. Many people, 
of course, don't take a vacation for one reason or another, but I'd like you to tell me some things about 
any holidays or vacations you, yourself, may have had during a 12-month period — let's say from Novem- 
ber 1st last year to the end of October this year. Please do not count weekends or long weekends or statu- 
tory holidays. 

Did you, yourself, take any such vacations or holidays during the past year — that is, since a year ago 
October 31st? 

Yes □ NO 19-1 GO TO NEXT SECTION 

-b) Were you away from home on a trip overnight or longer during that period? 

YES 2 NO 3 GO TO NEXT SECTION 



53 



ABOUT TRAVEL— ASK EVERYONE 18 YEARS OF AGE AND OVER 



Next, I'd like you to tell me more about the trips you took during your holidays. Let's take the most recent 
trip first. 

NOTE: EACH COLUMN REFERS TO ONE TRIP. ASK QUESTION 4 THROUGH TO QUESTION 
20 FOR MOST RECENT TRIP FIRST, THEN REPEAT Q. 4 TO Q. 20 FOR EACH 
EARLIER VACATION TRIP UNTIL ALL SUCH TRIPS (UP TO A MAXIMUM OF 3) ARE 
RECORDED FOR THE LAST 12 MONTHS. 



Considering the total trip — that is, from the day you left home until the day you got back home — could 
you tell me all the places where you spent at least one night. That is in each province, each state, or in 
other countries. Please include any nights you spent on the trip in your own province, and also any nights 
you spent while you were at your destination. 



PLACES SPENT AT LEAST ONE NIGHT 

NEWFOUNDLAND 

PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND 

NOVA SCOTIA 

NEW BRUNSWICK 

QUEBEC 

ONTARIO 

MANITOBA 

SASKATCHEWAN 

ALBERTA 

BRITISH COLUMBIA 

YUKON /N.W.T. 

> CONTINENTAL U.S.A.— INCLUDING ALASKA 
(SPECIFY STATES) 



MOST RECENT 


NEXT MOST 


TRIP BEFORE 


VACATION TRIP 


RECENT 


THAT 


20-1 


.. 27-1 

2 


34-1 


2 


2 


3 


3 


3 


4 


4 


4 


5 


5 


5 


6 


6 


6 


7 


7 


7 


<8 


<8 


<8 


9 


9 


9 











X 


X 


X 







21- 


28- 


35- 


22- 


29- 


36- 


23- 


30- 


37- 


24- 


31- 


38- 


25- 


32- 


39- 



54 



>>HAWAII . -_. . 


26-1 


33-1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 



X 

Y 


40-1 


>>U.S. VIRGIN ISLANDS _ _ _ . 


. __ 2 _ _. 


2 


>>PUERTO RICO 

OTHER CARIBBEAN ._ __. 


3 

4 


3 

4 


BERMUDA ._ _ 


5 


5 


UNITED KINGDOM 


6 


6 


FRANCE 

GERMANY 

SWITZERLAND 


7 _ 

8 

9 


7 

8 

9 


NETHERLANDS/HOLLAND 








ITALY 

ALL OTHER EUROPEAN 


X 

Y 


X 

Y 


OTHER COUNTRIES (SPECIFY) . 





















IF SASKATCHEWAN INTERVIEW, AND IF TRIP WAS TO SASKATCHEWAN <, ASK QUESTIONS 5 AND 6, 
7 TO 9 IF ALSO VISITED CONTINENTAL U.S.A., HAWAII, U.S. VIRGIN ISLANDS, PUERTO RICO ON THAT 
TRIP AND QUESTIONS 10 TO 20. 

ASK QUESTIONS 7 TO 20 IF TRIP WAS TO CONTINENTAL U.S.A., HAWAII, U.S. VIRGIN ISLANDS, PUERTO 
RICO.>> 

ASK QUESTIONS 10 TO 20 IF TRIP WAS TO ANY OTHER PLACE. 






55 



ABOUT TRAVEL— ASK EVERYONE 18 YEARS OF AGE AND OVER 



ASK QUESTIONS 5 AND 6 IN SASKATCHEWAN ONLY AND 

IF SASKATCHEWAN VISITED IN Q. 4<BY SASKATCHEWAN RESIDENT 

5-a) (HAND ORANGE CARD 1) On that trip, in 
which of these areas in this province did you 
stay overnight, if any? Just read me the letters. 

MOST RECENT NEXT MOST TRIP BEFORE 

VACATION TRIP RECENT THAT 

A. 41-1 48-1 55-1 

B. 2 2 2 

C. 3 3 3 

D. 4 4 4 

E. 5 5 5 

F. 6 6 6 

G. 7 7 7 

H. 8 8 8 

I. 9 9 9 

J. 

K. X X X 

L Y Y Y 

M 42-1 49-1 56-1 

N. 2 2 2 

0. 3 3 3 

P. 4 4 4 

NONEOFTHESE 5 5 5 

-b) (IF MORE THAN ONE AREA VISITED ON THAT 
TRIP ASK:) In which one of those areas did you 
stay the longest? 

A. 

B. 

C. 

D. 

E. 

F. 

G. 

H. 

I. 

J. 

K. 

L. 

M 

N. 

0. 

P. 



43-1 


50 


-1 


57-1 


2 




2 


2 


3 




3 


3 


4 




4 


4 


5 




5 


5 


6 




6 


6 


7 




7 


7 


8 




8 


8 


9 




9 


9 













X 




X 


X 


Y 




Y 


Y 


44-1 


51 


-1 


58-1 


2 




2 


2 


3 




3 


3 


4 




4 


4 



56 



6-a) (HAND ORANGE CARD 2) While vacationing in 
that particular area, in which of these activities 
did you personally participate, if any? 

Boating, canoeing 

Fishing 

Hunting 

Camping 

Downhill skiing 

Cross-country skiing 

Visiting a historic site/museum 

Attending a festival or special event 

Attending a spectator sport 

Shopping 

Visiting friends and relatives 

Participating in a business meeting, 

conference, convention 

Other 

NONE OF THESE 



45-1 


52- 


-1 


59-1 


2 




2 


2 


3 




3 


3 


4 




4 


4 


5 




5 


5 


6 




6 


6 


7 




7 


7 


8 




8 


8 


9 




9 


9 













X 




X 


X 


Y 




Y 


Y 


46-1 


53 


-1 


60-1 


2 




2 


2 



-b) And again in that particular area, in which of 
these types of accommodation did you stay: 
(READ) 

— hotel or motel 47-1 54-1 61-1 

— your own vaaction home, 2 2 2 

— a campground 3 3 3 

— a rental house, cabin or cottage 4 4 4 

— with friends or relatives; or 5 5 5 

— some other place? 6 6 6 

GO TO QUESTION 10 IF TRIP WAS NOT TO CONTINENTAL U.S.A., HAWAII, U.S. VIRGIN ISLANDS, 
PUERTO RICO.>> 



57 



ABOUT TRAVEL— ASK EVERYONE 18 YEARS OF AGE AND OVER 



ASK QUESTIONS 7 TO 9 IF TRIP WAS TO CONTINENTAL U.S.A., HAWAII, U.S. VIRGIN ISLANDS PUERTO 
RICO. 



How long before you started on this trip, did 
you finally decide to visit the United States (or 
Hawaii/U.S. Virgin Islands/Puerto Rico, if ap- 
plicable)? 



MOST RECENT 
VACATION TRIP 



NEXT MOST 
RECENT 



DURING THE TRIP 

UP TO 2 WEEKS BEFORE 

2 WEEKS UP TO 4 WEEKS ___ 

1 MONTH UP TO 2 MONTHS 

2 MONTHS UP TO 4 MONTHS 
4 MONTHS UP TO 6 MONTHS 
6 MONTHS OR OVER 



62-1 10-1 



TRIP BEFORE 
THAT 



19- 



8. On that trip, what were your most favourable 
impressions about vacationing in the United 
States (or Hawaii/U.S. Virgin Islands/ Puerto 
Rico, if applicable)? (PROBE) Anything else? 
(RECORD VERBATIM) 



NO FAVOURABLE IMPRESSIONS 



- □ 

63- 

64- 



□ 
11- 
12- 



□ 
20- 
21- 



9. On that trip, what were your most unfavourable 
impressions about vacationing in the United 
States (or Hawaii/U.S. Virgin Islands/ Puerto 
Rico, if applicable)? (PROBE) Anything else? 
(RECORD VERBATIM) 



NO UNFAVOURABLE IMPRESSIONS □ 

65- 
66- 



□ 
13- 
14- 



□ 
22- 
23- 



58 



ASK EVERYBODY 



10-a) How many nights in total were you away from 
home on that trip? 

TOTAL NUMBER OF NIGHTS: 



(67/68) 



(15/16) 



(24/25) 



-b) (IF VISITED BOTH THE UNITED STATES (IN- 
CLUDE HAWAII, U.S. VIRGIN ISLANDS AND 
PUERTO RICO) AND OTHER PLACES OR PROV- 
INCES IN Q. 4 ASK) How many of those nights 
did you spend in the United States including 
Hawaii, U.S. Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico? 



(69/70) 
(71/75) 



(17/18) 



(26/27) 






59 



ABOUT TRAVEL— ASK EVERYONE 18 YEARS OF AGE AND OVER 



ASK EVERYBODY 

11-a) As best as you can recall, could you tell me 
about how much was spent altogether by you 
and your party for that trip, including any credit 
card purchases or fares — in other words, the 
total cost of the trip. 



MOST RECENT NEXT MOST TRIP BEFORE 
VACATION TRIP RECENT THAT 



$ 



$- 



ABSOLUTELY CAN'T RECALL 



(28/31) (43/46) (58/61) 

D □ □ 



■b) (IF VISITED BOTH THE UNITED STATES (IN- 
CLUDE HAWAII, U.S. VIRGIN ISLANDS AND 
PUERTO RICO) AND OTHER PLACES OR PROV- 
INCES IN Q. 4 ASK) And about how much of 
that was spent in the United States, (including 
Hawaii, U.S. Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico) 
Please include any travel expenditures made in 
Canada to get there. 



ABSOLUTELY CANT RECALL 



$- 



$- 



$- 



(32/35) (47/50) (62/65) 

□ □ G 



12. 



Could you tell 
that trip: 



me in which month you started 



November, 1975 
December, 1975 
January, 1976 __ 
February, 1976 _ 
March, 1976 ___ 

April, 1976 

May, 1976 

June, 1976 

July, 1976 

August, 1976 ___ 
September, 1976 
October, 1976 __ 



-2 


51-2 


66-2 


3 


3 


3 


4 


4 


4 


5 


5 


5 


6 


6 


6 


7 


7 


7 


8 


8 


8 


9 


9 


9 











X 


X 


X 


Y 


Y 


Y 


■1 


52-1 


67-1 



60 



13. (HAND ORANGE CARD 3) In which of these 
types of accommodation did you stay on this 
trip? 

HOTEL 

MOTEL 

RESORT OR LODGE 

YOUR OWN VACATION HOME OR COTTAGE 

RENTED CABIN OR COTTAGE 

GOVERNMENT CAMPGROUND OR 

TRAILERSITE 

COMMERCIAL CAMPGROUND OR 

TRAILERSITE 

WITH FRIENDS 

WITH RELATIVES 

OTHER 

14. And about how many miles away from home was 
the farthest point you travelled on that trip — 
that is, one way? 

No Idea 



38-1 




53-1 




68-1 


2 




2 




2 


3 




3 




3 


4 




4 




4 


5 




5 




5 


6 




6 




6 


7 . 




7 




7 


8 . 




8 




8 


9 . 




9 




9 

















(39/42) 




(54/57) 


(69/72) 


- n - 




□ 




D 



ABOUT TRAVEL— ASK EVERYONE 18 YEARS OF AGE AND OVER 



15-a) Now would you tell me what was the main type 
of transportation you used on that trip? 



MOST RECENT NEXT MOST TRIP BEFORE 
VACATION TRIP RECENT THAT 



CAR 

MOTOR CAMPER 

PLANE 

TRAIN 

BUS 

BOAT 

OTHER (CIRCLE CODE AND SPECIFY) 



73-1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 



<<. 



12-1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 



<<. 



17-1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 



<< 



-b) Were your transportation, accommodation and 
other arrangements bought as part of an inclu- 
sive package tour or were your arrangements for 
transportation and accommodation made sepa- 
rately? 

INCLUSIVE PACKAGE TOUR 

ARRANGEMENTS MADE SEPARATELY 



74-1 
2 



13-1 
2 



18-1 
2 



-c) (IF "PLANE" << IN Q. 15-a) ASK:) Was your 
trip on a regularly-scheduled flight or a charter 
flight? 

REGULARLY SCHEDULED FLIGHT 

CHARTER FLIGHT 



ASK EVERYONE 



16. Did you consult with a travel agent when plan- 
ning this trip? 

YES 

NO 



75-1 
2 



14-1 
2 



19-1 
2 



5-1 



6-0 



7-1 



8-2 



9-1 



62 



17. (HAND ORANGE CARD 4) Which of those de- 
scriptions best describe your reasons for taking 
this trip? Just read me the letters: you may want 
to give me two or three. 

A. 

B. 

C. 

D. 

E. 

F. 

G. 

H. 



J. 
K. 
L. 
M. 
N. 



10-1 


15- 


-1 


20-1 


2 




2 


2 


3 




3 


3 


4 




4 


4 


5 




5 


5 


6 




6 


6 


7 




7 


7 


8 




8 


8 


9 




9 


9 













X 




X 


X 


Y 




Y 


Y 


11-1 


16- 


-1 


21-1 


2 




2 


2 



63 



ABOUT TRAVEL— ASK EVERYONE 18 YEARS OF AGE AND OVER 



ASK EVERYONE 



18-a) How many people were travelling together in 
your travel party, including yourself — that is, 
people travelling in your group only, but not the 
other members of a tour or charter, for instance 
in each of the following categories? (READ EACH 
AND WRITE IN NUMBER) 



From your own household: How many were: 



18 years or over, including yourself? 



Under 18 years? 



MOST RECENT 
VACATION TRIP 

22- 



23- 



NEXT MOST 
RECENT 

28- _ 



29- 



TRIP BEFORE 
THAT 

34- 

_ 35- 



-b) People in your party from other households: 
How many were: 

18 years or over? 

Under 18 years? 



TOTAL 



24- 


30- 
31- 


3fi- 


25- 


37- 


?6- 


3?- 


3R- 



19. Where was your home at the time of this trip? 
(CHECK BOX IF SAME COMMUNITY AS AT 
PRESENT, OTHERWISE WRITE IN NAME OF 
TOWN AND PROVINCE /STATE OR OVERSEAS 
COUNTRY) 

SAME AS AT PRESENT ___. 
OTHER 



□ 



27- 



□ 



□ 



(TOWN/ PROVINCE/COUNTRY 
33- 39- 



20. Did you take any other trips during this 12- 
month period we have been talking about? 



YES 



NO. 



□ GO TO 


n 


GO TO 


n 


GO TO 


Q. 4 




Q. 4 




Q. 21 


□ CIRCLE 


n 


CIRCLE 


□ 


CIRCLE 


T 




'2' 




'3' 


AFTER 




AFTER 




AFTER 


Q. 21 




Q. 21 




Q. 21 


THEN 




THEN 




THEN 


GO TO 




GO TO 




GO TO 


Q. 22 




Q. 22 




Q. 22 



64 



21. (ASK IF 'YES' TO Q. 20 AFTER THIRD TRIP) How many other vacation trips did you take in between last 
year and October 31st this year? 

(WRITE IN) 



(INTERVIEWER; CIRCLE TOTAL NUMBER OF VACATION TRIPS TAKEN:) 
123456789 OR MORE (SPECIFY) 40- 

22. Even if you have not vacationed in the United States or in Canada, I'd like your impression on whether one 
country is more expensive to travel in than the other at this time. First, would you say that gasoline in the 

U.S. is generally more expensive than in Canada, less expensive, or about the same? What about ? 

(READ EACH LISTED BELOW) 

MORE EXPENSIVE LESS EXPENSIVE ABOUT NO 

THAN IN CANADA THAN IN CANADA THE SAME IDEA 

—Gasoline? 41-1 2 3 4 

— Air fares? 42-1 2 3 4 

— Hotel or motel room rates? 43-1 2 3 4 

— Dining out? 44-1 2 3 4 

— Souvenirs and gift shopping? 45-1 2 3 4 

— Overail — considering the total cost 

(47/75) of a similar type of trip? 46-1 2 3 _ 4 



65 



CANADIAN FACTS CO. LIMITED 
TORONTO-VANCOUVER-MONTREAL 



BASIC DATA— FILL IN AT THE END OF INTERVIEW AS INSTRUCTED 



CIRCLE: 

MR. /MISS/MRS. 

MAILING 
ADDRESS: 



POSTAL 
CODE: _. 



PHONE NO. 



WRITE CLEARLY OR PRINT, GIVE INITIALS 

INTERVIEW 
NO. 



_TOWN: 



NONE □ 



ON LOCATION 
NO. 



-PROVINCE: (CIRCLE CODE) 



NFLD 19-1 

P.E.I. 2 

N.S. 3 

N.B. 4 

QUE 5 



DDE) 


(15/18) 


ONT 


6 


MAN 


7 


SASK 


8 


ALTA 


9 


B.C. 






SEX: MALE 20-1 

FEMALE 2 



1. IF THIS HOUSEHOLD IS LOCATED IN A RURAL AREA (i.e., A COMMUNITY OF LESS THAN 1,000 POP- 
ULATION OR OPEN COUNTRY), ASK: 



-a) Is there more than one acre in this property? 



■b) Last year, did you sell more than $50 worth of 
products grown or raised on this property? 



YES 



□ ASK -b) 

NO 21-1 



YES 
NO 



2-a) Are there any children under 18 years of age 
living at home? 



-b) (IF "YES") 

Are any of them . . 



YES 
NO 



22-1 

GO TO 
Q. 3-a) 

YES NO 



under 5 years of age? 23-1 2 

5 to 14 years of age? 24-1 2 



15 to 17 years of age? 
-c) Total number of children under 18 years living at home 27- 



26-1 2 



(25) 



66 



3-a) How many people live in this household, including yourself, other members of your family and anyone 
else living as part of your household who is not a member of your immediate family? 

-b) How many are 15 years of age or over? 

-c) How many are 18 years of age or over? 

-a) -b) -c) 

TOTAL NUMBER TOTAL NUMBER TOTAL NUMBER 

IN HOUSEHOLD 15 AND OVER 18 AND OVER 

One 28-1 30-1 31-1 

Two 2 2 2 

Three 3 3 3 

Four 4 4 4 

Five 5 5 5 

Six 6 6 6 

Seven 7 7 7 

Eight 8 8 8 

Nine 9 9 9 

Ten or More 

NONE X 



67 



(cont'd) BASIC DATA— FILL IN AT THE END OF INTERVIEW AS INSTRUCTED 

4. What is your marital status? Single 32-1 

Are you . . . (READ LIST) Married? 2 

Widow(er), Divorced, Separated? 3 

5. What was the language you first spoke in child- English 33-1 

hood and still understand? French — (Quebec Interview) 2 

French — (Non-Quebec Interview) 3 

Other: (CIRCLE CODE AND SPECIFY) 

4 

6. What language do you speak most often at home English 34-1 

now? French 2 

Other 3 

7. What is your position in this household? Male Head 35-1 

(READ LIST IF NECESSARY) Fema , e H ead 2 

Son 3 

Daughter 4 

Other Male 5 

Other Female 6 

8-a) What is your occupation? TYPE OF JOB: 

TYPE OF COMPANY: 36- 

Retired, Pensioned, 37-1 

Student, 2 

Unemployed, 3 

Homemaker Only, 4 

Homemaker employed outside 

home? □ ASK -b) 38 ~ 

-b) Is that part-time, Q (STATE JOB) 

or full-time? fj (STATE JOB) 39- 

9. What is the occupation of the head of the house? TYPE OF JOB: 

TYPE OF COMPANY: 40- 

Retired, Pensioned, 41-1 

Student, 2 

Unemployed, 3 

Homemaker Only? 4 



68 



10. What was the name of the last school you at- SOME GRADUATED 
tended? How far did you go? Public/elementary school 

(Grades 1-8 — Quebec 

Grades 1-7) 42-1 __ 2 

Secondary/ high school 
(Grades 9-13 — Quebec 
Grades 8-12) 3 ._ 4 

Technical/senior college 
(Above Grades 12 or 13 — 
Quebec CEGEP/ college 
classique) 5 __ 6 

University 7 __ 8 

No formal schooling 9 

Refused 

Any additional schooling 

11. What was your exact age on your last birthday? Interviewer: If RESPONDENT 

REFUSES— npnnnn 

RECORD 

Estimate EXACT 

Exact Age Years AGE (43/44) 



69 



(cont'd) BASIC DATA— FILL IN AT THE END OF INTERVIEW AS INSTRUCTED 



13. 



14. 



15. 



TOTAL FAMILY INCOME 

(HAND WHITE CARD 1) In which of these letter 
groups does the approximate income of the 
family fall — that is, the income or earnings of 
all the family members living here added to- 
gether? 

IF REFUSED OR DON'T KNOW, 
GIVE BEST ESTIMATE 



(PER YEAR) 

TOTAL FAMILY INCOME 



INCOME OF HEAD OF HOUSE 
(HAND WHITE CARD 2) Now, in which of these 
letter groups does the approximate income of 
the head of the house fall? 

IF REFUSED OR DON'T KNOW, 
GIVE BEST ESTIMATE 



(PER YEAR) 

HEAD OF HOUSE 



CHECK TYPE OF DWELLING AND ASK: Do you 
own or rent your home? 

TYPE OF DWELLING (OBSERVE, DO NOT ASK) 



L 49-1 

M 2 

N 3 

4 

P 5 

Q 6 

R 7 

REFUSED □ 8 9 

L, M or N 50-1 

2 

P 3 

Q 4 

R 5 

S 6 

T 7 

U 8 

V 9 

W 

REFUSED □ 51-1 

OWN 52-1 

RENT 2 

SINGLE OR SEMI-DETACHED HOUSE 53-1 

ROW HOUSES 2 

DUPLEX, TRIPLEX, OR QUADRUPLEX 3 

SUITE OVER STORE, ETC. 4 

APARTMENT (5-7 UNITS) 5 

APARTMENT (8-19 UNITS) 6 

APARTMENT (20 OR MORE UNITS) 7 

ROOM(S), PART OF HOME 8 

OTHER (CIRCLE CODE AND SPECIFY) 9 



70 



(cont'cH BASIC DATA— FILL IN AT THE END OF INTERVIEW AS INSTRUCTED 



EITHER 



IF INTERVIEWING MONDAY TO FRIDAY, SAY: 

16. We are interested in finding out how often people are at home on weekdays at about this time. We 
are not interested in Saturdays and Sundays, only weekdays. 



-a) Did you happen to be at home yesterday (or 
last preceding weekday) at about this time? 



AT 
HOME 



(WRITE IN NAME OF DAY) 54-1 



NOT CAN'T REMEMBER/ 
HOME DON'T KNOW 



-b) How about 



(SAY AND WRITE IN WEEKDAY BEFORE) 



55-1 



-c) How about 



56-1 



(SAY AND WRITE IN WEEKDAY BEFORE) 
NOTE: WORK BACK THROUGH 3 PRECEDING WEEKDAYS 

OR 



IF INTERVIEWING SATURDAY, SAY INSTEAD: 

-a) We are interested in finding out how often 
people are at home on Saturday at about this 
time. For instance, did you happen to be at 
home last Saturday at about this time? 57-1 



AT 
HOME 



-b) How about the Saturday before that, at about 

this time? 58-1 



NOT CAN'T REMEMBER/ 
HOME DON'T KNOW 



AUTOMATIC CLASSIFICATION— OBSERVE, DO NOT ASK 



SOCIOECONOMIC LEVEL 

UPPER 59-9 

UPPER MIDDLE 8 

7 

6 
MIDDLE 5 

4 

LOWER MIDDLE 3 

2 

LOWER 1 



Interviewer's Signature: 



INTERVIEW NUMBER WITHIN HOUSEHOLD: 

FIRST 60-1 

SECOND 2 

THIRD 3 

FOURTH 4 

FIFTH 5 

DAY OF INTERVIEW: 

Monday 61-1 

Tuesday 2 

Wednesday 3 

Thursday 4 

Friday 5 

Saturday 6 



Employer Number: 



Date: 



62- 



71 



PENN STATE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES 



AD00D?n c H7DA 






January 1978